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Thursday, 14 Dec 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story KWALLET NEEDS A SERIOUS FACE-LIFT ; ENTER KSECRET SERVICE Rianne Schestowitz 08/05/2015 - 8:26pm
Story This is my favorite Android phone Rianne Schestowitz 08/05/2015 - 8:06pm
Story 6 things Android Wear smartwatches can do that the Apple Watch can't Rianne Schestowitz 08/05/2015 - 7:49pm
Story Teclast X70 3G Is the First Tablet with Intel Atom x3, Sells for $50 Roy Schestowitz 08/05/2015 - 7:32pm
Story New Linux rootkit leverages graphics cards for stealth Roy Schestowitz 08/05/2015 - 6:19pm
Story Controversial Lennart Poettering Finds His Place In Linux Community Roy Schestowitz 08/05/2015 - 5:41pm
Story A More Stable Future for Ubuntu Roy Schestowitz 08/05/2015 - 5:24pm
Story LibreOffice 4.4.3 Released, Available To Install/Upgrade In Ubuntu/Linux Mint Mohd Sohail 08/05/2015 - 10:19am
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 08/05/2015 - 9:36am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 08/05/2015 - 9:35am

Internet Blackout: The final verdict

Filed under
Web

zdnet.com.au: The Great Australian Internet Blackout campaign against mandatory ISP-level filtering has attracted twice as many websites to its cause as had pledged before it began.

Linux in the school office

Filed under
Linux

computerworlduk.com: A big MIS-take… MIS stands for Management Information System. A MIS is at the heart of every school office nowadays. In the UK the leading MIS is from Capita-SIMS.net and it has a huge market share. In fact for many it is the de-facto school MIS.

Ubuntu: More bugs than ever?

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu: More bugs than ever?
  • Discovering Ubuntu 9.10, a Free Linux OS
  • Ubuntu 8.04.4 LTS Update Released

Danes ditch Microsoft, take ODF road - at last

Filed under
Microsoft

theregister.co.uk: The Danish Parliament has agreed to ditch some Microsoft-based software in favour of the ODF standard from April next year.

Save "Sita Sings the Blues" from the Flash format: can you convert FLA?

Filed under
Movies

Nina Paley’s “Sita Sings the Blues” is becoming a huge critical success, and may even succeed financially, which is unusual for any independent film, but virtually unprecedented for free culture films (“Sita” was released under the CC By-SA). There’s only one sad thing about this for free software fans, and that’s that “Sita” was made using proprietary software, and the “source code” is in a proprietary format: Adobe Flash’s “FLA” format, to be precise. Paley has posted these files on the Internet Archive, but she doesn’t know how to translate them into any free software friendly format (and neither do Sleepy. Can you help?

Read the full story at Free Software Magazine.

Review: Tiny Core Linux

Filed under
Linux

ericsbinaryworld.com/blog: The guys over at Linux Outlaws are always talking about Tiny Core Linux because it always seems to be releasing a new version. I was impressed back in the day that Damn Small Linux could have a working Linux distro in only 50 MB. I know that Tiny Core Linux is technically not a full Linux distro, but I wanted to see what all the fuss was about.

What evil lurks in OCFS2

Filed under
Linux

geekscrap.com: In the beginning, Linux was a free general purpose OS and it was not clear how Linux companies would generate profits out of it. One of the key technologies of enterprise server market is Storage Area Network: an infrastructure that abstracts storage resources.

Canonical copyright assignment policy 'same as others'

Filed under
Ubuntu

itwire.com: Canonical chief executive Mark Shuttleworth has called for an uniform copyright assignment policy for contributors to free and open source software projects.

Linux super-duper admin tools: Strace

Filed under
Software

dedoimedo.com: Strace is a utility that can trace system calls. If you're wondering what system calls are, they are a translation mechanism that provides interface between a process and the operating system (kernel). These calls can be intercepted and read, allowing for a better understanding of what a process is trying to do at a given runtime.

What? Free Linux Training Becoming Available

Filed under
Linux

zdnet.co.uk/blog: I have often heard people speaking of the fragmentation of Linux, what with all the different distributions, and this makes it harder for there to be a single "standard" for support engineers to reach. Opinions such as these often end with comments about how Microsoft beats everyone else hands down with their certification scheme.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • GCC to support Google's Go
  • RevLin OS: Would You Use It?
  • Distromania: A Multi-booting Template
  • Puppy Arcade 6
  • Novell: Virtualization not for all servers
  • setiQuest: Out of this World Free Software
  • Fedora Linux history tour
  • 6 of the best desktop search tools for Linux
  • What's Next for Firefox? Electrolysis
  • KDE to Appear at SCALE 8x
  • Tagging the Noosphere
  • Letters and Numbers Learning Game for Kids in Ubuntu Linux : lletters
  • Virtual darkroom plus virtual light table - it’s darktable!
  • New project: marave, a relaxed text editor
  • Limits?
  • detox for troublesome file names
  • Wikimedia hires open-source veteran as CTO
  • Linux Outlaws 133 - Shabba!
  • The Linux Link Tech Show Episode 338

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Gentooize Part 1: colorize console
  • Project: Building An All-Text Linux Workstation - Part 8
  • How to Install and Use Mac Fonts on Ubuntu
  • CentOS – Install Java Sun JDK
  • Make Pretty GUI Apps Fast with Python-Qt
  • GIMP: Creating a new image from a copied image
  • Tech Tip: Use gxmessage for Displaying GUI Messages from Scripts
  • Further control of Linux files with ACL
  • How to make gnome-dictionary work offline
  • Ratproxy - A Passive Web Application Security Assessment Tool

Ubuntu, Yahoo, Microsoft, and bears oh my

Filed under
Ubuntu

blog.nixternal.com: Yes, as many of you have read recently, Canonical has created a deal with Yahoo! to provide the default search for Firefox in the Lucid release. personally think this deal between Canonical and Yahoo! is a good one, and to be honest, I wouldn’t mind seeing more of these deals.

Waiting for the open source impact

Filed under
Microsoft
OSS

zdnet.com.au/blogs: Waiting for open source to give Microsoft a much-needed kick up the jacksie has seemed like waiting for Godot. We wait, we wait and we are still waiting.

Could open source abandon the Google train?

Filed under
Google
OSS

news.cnet.com: As arguably the world's largest open-source company, Google has a big stake in maintaining its place at the heart of the open-source ecosystem. Recent events, however, suggest that Google can't rest on its laurels if it wants to secure the hearts and minds of open-source developers.

Surviving Windows

Filed under
Ubuntu

mybroadband.co.za/blogs: I have recently converted all but one of my personal computers to Ubuntu. To be more specific I am now using Ubuntu 9.10 on two desktops and one Netbook. It has been a gamble but so far so good.

5 reasons why Ubuntu Lucid Lynx may be a game changing release

Filed under
Ubuntu

ghabuntu.com: It is not the most profitable of those in its class, neither is it the oldest nor the classiest. However, it is the most popular and that popularity is set to increase come this April with the release of the LTS edition of Ubuntu Linux.

Eight ways Android and Linux tablets can beat Apple's iPad

linuxfordevices.com: Apple's newly announced iPad has been touted as "magical," "amazing," and "revolutionary" by company officials. But, key deficiencies in the device provide opportunities for competitors, who can craft better tablets that run Linux or Android.

Oracle tag teams Solaris and Linux

  • Oracle tag teams Solaris and Linux
  • Oracle Talks Plans for Linux, Solaris
  • Sunset: The Oracle Acquisition Q&A

J.D. Salinger, novelist of modern anomie, dead at 91

Filed under
Obits

jewishjournal.com: J. D. Salinger, the novelist whose “Catcher in the Rye,” was the gateway drug for a generation of teenagers, readers and writers resisting the social conformity, and who became almost as famous for being reclusive as he was for his novel and his collections of short stories, died at his home in New Hampshire, at 91.

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More in Tux Machines

5 Kubernetes must-reads: Tips and trends

Kubernetes is having a moment – but don’t look for its popularity to wane anytime soon. As enterprises move beyond experimenting and start working in earnest with containers, the number of containers multiply: So do the manual chores. Orchestration tools like Kubernetes add automated help. “Running a few standalone containers for development purposes won’t rob your IT team of time or patience: A standards-based container runtime by itself will do the job,” Red Hat technology evangelist Gordon Haff recently noted. “But once you scale to a production environment and multiple applications spanning many containers, it’s clear that you need a way to coordinate those containers to deliver the individual services. As containers accumulate, complexity grows. Eventually, you need to take a step back and group containers along with the coordinated services they need, such as networking, security, and telemetry.” (See Haff’s full article, How enterprise IT uses Kubernetes to tame container complexity.) Read more

Australian Securities Exchange completes Red Hat migration

The Australian Securities Exchange (ASX) has completed the migration of "mission-critical" legacy applications to the Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform (JBoss EAP). ASX first deployed JBoss EAP in 2011 to modernise its legacy technologies and to facilitate the introduction of new web applications after it realised its legacy application server platform was becoming increasingly inconsistent, unstable, and expensive. After the initial ASX Online Company migration was complete in 2012, ASX used JBoss EAP to build the ASX.com API, as well as its Sharemarket Game, which gives players the opportunity to learn how the share market works. Read more

Programming/Development: GAPID 1.0 and Atom 1.23

  • Diagnose and understand your app's GPU behavior with GAPID
  • GAPID 1.0 Released As Google's Cross-Platform Vulkan Debugger
    Back in March we wrote about GAPID as a new Google-developed Vulkan debugger in its early stages. Fast forward to today, GAPID 1.0 has been released for debugging Vulkan apps/games on Linux/Windows/Android as well as OpenGL ES on Android. GAPID is short for the Graphics API Debugger and allows for analyzing rendering and performance issues with ease using its GUI interface. GAPID also allows for easily experimenting with code changes to see their rendering impact and allows for offline debugging. GAPID has its own format and capturetrace utility for capturing traces of Vulkan (or GLES on Android too) programs for replaying later on with GAPID.
  • Hackable Text Editor Atom 1.23 Adds Better Compatibility for External Git Tools
    GitHub released Atom 1.23, the monthly update of the open-source and cross-platform hackable text editor application loved by numerous developers all over the world. Including a month's worth of enhancements, Atom 1.23 comes with the ability for packages to register URI handler functions, which can be invoked whenever the user visits a URI that starts with "atom://package-name/," and a new option to hide certain commands in the command palette when registering them via "atom.commands.add." Atom 1.23 also improves the compatibility with external Git tools, as well as the performance of the editor by modifying the behavior of several APIs to no longer make callbacks more than once in a text buffer transaction. Along with Atom 1.23, GitHub also released Teletype 0.4.0, a tool that allows developers to collaborate simultaneously on multiple files.

Red Hat GNU/Linux and More