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About Tux Machines

Thursday, 30 Mar 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Monitor CPU Speed with Gkfreq Plugin for Gkrellm

  • Using Gmail to Bypass “Email Already In Use” Errors
  • Using ssh as a generic stdin consumer and stdout producer
  • Remove trash in Ubuntu
  • How To Download Almost Any Web-Based Email Via POP
  • How To Find What Package Provided a File?
  • Bash tips: if -e wildcard file check => [: too many arguments
  • AOL on PCLinuxOS
  • Adjust sudo timeout
  • Qt-4.5.0 on Gentoo portage tree
  • Upgrading to PostgreSQL 8.3 on Gentoo

MSWord To OpenOffice And Back Again

Filed under
OOo

oneclicklinux.com: I've been working on a letter and needed a little bit of input. I called my brother Dave and he said he'd take a look at what I had composed so far.

The Flock Flap

Filed under
Software

informationweek.com: Dealing with rumors and gossip is like nailing jelly to the wall. The right (wrong?) ones take on a patina of truth they don't deserve, just because they sound right or we feel they should be right.

MythTV made easy

Filed under
Software

tuxradar.com: MythTV is an incredibly ambitious suite of applications designed to sit at the heart of your home entertainment centre. It records, pauses and rewinds television, plays music and videos, catalogues your photo and DVD collections, browses the internet, makes phone calls, delivers the news and the weather and plays games - and it does all this thanks to the power of Linux.

Dinner with Microsoft

Filed under
Microsoft

fsf.org: When you visit Microsoft's web site for New England Research & Development Center you don't get a sense that it is a part of a 30 year old multinational proprietary corporation with a bad track record when it comes to user freedom and community support. But, we aren't fooled.

Should Opera abandon the desktop?

Filed under
Software

kyleabaker.com: According to Nate Lanxon at CNET UK, yep. I’m not going to quote the whole “article,” but here are my thoughts.

Mozilla rethinks the behavior of new browser tabs

Filed under
Moz/FF

downloadsquad.com: A few months ago Mozilla embarked on a quest to determine a way to make new browser tabs more useful. Today Mozilla's Aza Raskin shared some of the team's conclusions, based on user feedback.

The Reality of Using Linux Every Day

Filed under
Linux

laptoplogic.com: "It's full of bugs. Nothing ever works. I can't get it to do what I want. It's too hard."

The Linux desktop heads for the cloud

Filed under
Linux

news.cnet: While Linux desktop evangelists point to netbooks as an indication of renewed life in their chances to compete on the desktop, new data suggests that this may be a fool's hope. Instead, such advocates would do well to follow Canonical's and Red Hat's lead as they seek to move the desktop to the cloud.

Application installing

Filed under
Software

blogs.gnome.org: In the Linux desktop we have a very big problem: We focus very much on packages. Packages are interesting to programmers, but users care about applications.

Fanning the Flames of the Browser Security Wars

Filed under
Software

voices.washingtonpost: A report published this week by software vulnerability watcher Secunia promises to stoke the ever-smoldering embers of the debate over which major Web browser is more secure.

The Argument for Buying Linux Pre-Installed

Filed under
Linux

linuxloop.com: One of the things you hear a lot is that Macs “just work.” As nicely described in this article, Linux “just works” just as well if you only run it on hardware it was designed to run on. I would like to take the post one step further.

How to be Your Own Linux Tech Support

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

maketecheasier.com: When I first began using Linux, I was fortunate that I had a few friends around who knew it well, and were able to answer my questions and provide support. Not everyone is so lucky.

Mozilla Cooking Firefox 3.5, Forget Firefox 3.1

Filed under
Moz/FF

softpedia.com: In the Firefox Product Delivery Meeting Details, Mozilla notes that “version numbering [would advance from] 3.1 -> 3.5 to indicate increased scope.

Important Linux File Directories That Users Should Know About

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

junauza.com: To become more efficient, it is essential for a Linux user to learn some basic commands and keyboard shortcuts. He or she must also be familiar with several Linux file directories to at least learn a little on how the system works.

Linux on Netbooks, Caveats and Cautionary Tales

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

ostatic.com/blog: I purchased my ASUS EeePC 701 just over a year ago. It was inexpensive, it ran Linux, and that was more than enough for me. At Tectonic, Nic Ludick wonders if this isn't actually a bad thing in the long run for boosting Linux adoption.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Linux Outlaws 80 - Pull the FAT Out

  • FSF adds speakers for LibrePlanet conference on GNU/Linux
  • Understanding what it is to be open source
  • GNOME 2.26.0 Release Candidate Is Now Out
  • A Better Solitaire
  • ATI graphics card & compiz tearing
  • Firefox 3.0.7 security and stability release now available
  • Questions For: Mitchell Baker, Mozilla Chairman
  • DIY Linux
  • 5 Minutes of Elive 1.9.23
  • Microsoft tax on Linux’s horizon?
  • Text is not enough!
  • Installing Mepis 8
  • Fedora 11 Alpha YUM issues
  • Microsoft Office for netbooks being prepared
  • Starting the day with Ubuntu 8.10 Linux
  • Linux Mint 6 Felicia Fluxbox CE, In Depth
  • Qt Gets the Nokia Treatment
  • KDE 4.2.0 on Gentoo a week (or so) after
  • Windows gaming on Linux & Macs made easy
  • Linux tip: How to clean up KDE on logout
  • Ubuntu or Xubuntu? It’s getting harder to choose
  • The Real Story on Oracle Unbreakable Linux
  • SFLC Seeks Patent Attorney
  • Running / Using ext4 on openSUSE 11.1

Migrating to Linux in 5 Steps

Filed under
Linux

nixtutor.com: Migrating to Linux doesn’t have to be difficult. All you have to do is, get a fresh copy of your favorite distro, backup your data, find out what hardware is compatible, identify essential programs, and have a fresh hard drive or partition ready to go.

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More in Tux Machines

Security Leftovers

  • Someone is putting lots of work into hacking Github developers [Ed: Dan Goodin doesn't know that everything is under attack and cracking attempts just about all the time?]
    Open-source developers who use Github are in the cross-hairs of advanced malware that has steal passwords, download sensitive files, take screenshots, and self-destruct when necessary.
  • Security Orchestration and Incident Response
    Technology continues to advance, and this is all a changing target. Eventually, computers will become intelligent enough to replace people at real-time incident response. My guess, though, is that computers are not going to get there by collecting enough data to be certain. More likely, they'll develop the ability to exhibit understanding and operate in a world of uncertainty. That's a much harder goal. Yes, today, this is all science fiction. But it's not stupid science fiction, and it might become reality during the lifetimes of our children. Until then, we need people in the loop. Orchestration is a way to achieve that.

Leftover: Development (Linux)

  • Swan: Better Linux on Windows
    If you are a Linux user that has to use Windows — or even a Windows user that needs some Linux support — Cygwin has long been a great tool for getting things done. It provides a nearly complete Linux toolset. It also provides almost the entire Linux API, so that anything it doesn’t supply can probably be built from source. You can even write code on Windows, compile and test it and (usually) port it over to Linux painlessly.
  • Lint for Shell Scripters
    It used to be one of the joys of writing embedded software was never having to deploy shell scripts. But now with platforms like the Raspberry Pi becoming very common, Linux shell scripts can be a big part of a system–even the whole system, in some cases. How do you know your shell script is error-free before you deploy it? Of course, nothing can catch all errors, but you might try ShellCheck.
  • Android: Enabling mainline graphics
    Android uses the HWC API to communicate with graphics hardware. This API is not supported on the mainline Linux graphics stack, but by using drm_hwcomposer as a shim it now is. The HWC (Hardware Composer) API is used by SurfaceFlinger for compositing layers to the screen. The HWC abstracts objects such as overlays and 2D blitters and helps offload some work that would normally be done with OpenGL. SurfaceFlinger on the other hand accepts buffers from multiple sources, composites them, and sends them to the display.
  • Collabora's Devs Make Android's HWC API Work in Mainline Linux Graphics Stack
    Collabora's Mark Filion informs Softpedia today about the latest work done by various Collabora developers in collaboration with Google's ChromeOS team to enable mainline graphics on Android. The latest blog post published by Collabora's Robert Foss reveals the fact that both team managed to develop a shim called drm_hwcomposer, which should enable Android's HWC (Hardware Composer) API to communicate with the graphics hardware, including Android 7.0's version 2 HWC API.

today's howtos

Reports From and About Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF)