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Thursday, 08 Dec 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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The need to know: Documentation in Linux

Filed under
Linux

itpro.co.uk: Documenting the development of open source software is key to keeping it easy to use, but some disagree on its necessity. More often than not, documentation is an afterthought, and is what happens when the interesting bits of a software project are over and done.

What Are My Favorite Linux & OSS Websites?

Filed under
OSS
Web

don-guitar.com: A couple of weeks ago I made a deal with Susan Linton of tuxmachines.org. Lisa and I will write a two part article on why we're using Linux and why we've chosen the distros we use in return for having Susan write the Linux section of our ezine for one (possibly two) issues.

5 Best Free/Open-source Turn-based Strategy Games for Linux

Filed under
Gaming

junauza.com: After recommending those excellent real-time strategy (RTS) games for Linux, let's move on to this other type of strategic gaming referred to as turn-based.

Ubuntu Lunacy

Filed under
Ubuntu

insanelyabsurd.com/blog: We’re all pretty familiar with the how popular Ubuntu has become since it first started, but believe it or not there are actually still some people out there who choose to instead bash it because their distro flat out sucks. I’m not going to go into any of the names of the distro’s.

Elive The Age Of Enlightenment

Filed under
Linux

raiden.net: ELIVE is a live Linux CD showcasing the Enlightenment window manager/desktop shell. The Belgian project's slogan, "Where Debian Meets Enlightenment", provides us with an early hint that here is a Linux distribution built on very strong, very deep foundations.

GIMP 2.6.0 Released

Filed under
GIMP

gimp.org: The GIMP developers are proud to release GIMP 2.6.0 today. GIMP 2.6 is an important release from a development point of view. It features changes to the user interface addressing some often received complaints, and a tentative integration of GEGL, the graph based image processing library that will eventually bring high bit-depth and non-destructive editing to GIMP.

few howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Vim Tips

  • Linux RAR/7z/ZIP Cracking
  • FreeBSD: Load Kernel Module at Runtime
  • Simplify system security with the Uncomplicated Firewall
  • Patch me gently
  • Get things rolling with GUI
  • Ubuntu 8.04 Persistent Install To USB Stick
  • HOWTO : Home made NAS server with Ubuntu 8.04.1 – Part VII
  • Gnome system wide shortcut keys
  • Getting a Hand With Bash
  • managing mysql binary logs
  • Adding a new hard disk to Linux, and why the Linux filesystem trounces Windows' butt

Book Review: Linux in Easy Steps

Filed under
Linux

canllaith.org: I recently went looking for a good beginner’s resource for a budding Linux user, and came across Linux in Easy Steps by Mike McGrath. It’s an excellent primer for the new Linux user. Focused on the Ubuntu Linux distribution, Linux in Easy Steps covers installation, desktop configuration, and basic command line use in a slim volume with plenty of screenshots.

Are Microsoft's open source actions enough?

Filed under
Microsoft
OSS

itworldcanada.com: The world's biggest software company is best known for its proprietary technologies, but a technology center opened this year may contribute to enterprise interoperability. And yet the skepticism remains

Simply Mepis 8 is Looking Good

Filed under
Linux

preacherpen.wordpress: Linux is what my computers run on, and Simply Mepis is the particular distribution. I have been using Simply Mepis for a number of years, and have been extremely pleased with it. I have version 7.9.8 beta installed on my laptop, and couldn’t be happier with what I see.

The State of Kernel Mode-Setting

Filed under
Linux

phoronix.com: Earlier this year Fedora 9 was the first distribution providing kernel-based mode-setting (or KMS for short). At the time there was only a kernel mode-setting driver for Intel hardware and it ended up being disabled. With months having passed since our first article and Red Hat engineers working aggressively on KMS improvements for Fedora 10, we are providing another look at this technology and some of the recent advancements.

Is the Cloud Stupid?

redmonk.com: Count me among those less than intelligent by Stallman’s reckoning individuals that considers cloud computing inevitable. I’ll go further and argue that’s it’s not inevitable, it’s done. Already.

Kernel Log: 2.6.27 nearing completion; Btrfs to be added to the kernel?

Filed under
Linux

heise-online.co.uk: Linus Torvalds hinted that the eighth release candidate (RC) of Linux 2.6.27, would be the last RC prior to release of the next major kernel. Usually, once such a hint is dropped, it takes one to two weeks for the next version to be released.

Review: SimplyMEPIS 8.0 Beta 2

Filed under
Linux

headshotgamer.com: SimplyMEPIS was, believe it or not, my main distribution back in 2005 and used it with minimal complaints for a number of years. Then I moved away from Mepis and never returned - until now (/dramatic music).

OLPC / Amazon preparing to bring G1G1 to Europe?

Filed under
OLPC

olpcnews.com: There were 4 big questions when it was first revealed that Amazon would be running this year's edition of the Give 1 Get 1 program. 3 out of these 4 questions have been answered so what about the last one? Well, for the first time there are some indications that OLPC and Amazon are preparing to bring G1G1 v2 to Canada and Europe.

Rule #1: Hold On Loosely

Filed under
Legal

In the proprietary production world, what matters about a copyright is who owns it. In the free production world, however, who owns a copyright is relatively unimportant. What matters is what license it is offered under. There is a very simple rule of thumb about the best license to use: use a “free, copyleft license”.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Ubuntu Server: Canonical's Third Way to the Enterprise

  • Office 2007 docx to ODF Conversion
  • Video tour: Bluefish editor
  • Chávez chavs get Linux Classmates
  • Mandriva 2009 RC2 KDE4
  • ClickJacking! Nooooooooo!
  • Setting up your own certificate authority with gnoMint
  • Make Linux: Harder - Better - Faster
  • Ubuntu: Not A Small Business Server Replacement (Yet)
  • Running git-daemon under an unprivileged user
  • libZYpp, torrents and metalinks
  • The Conundrum of Choices and the Linux Learning Curve
  • Go Forward The Message
  • Pandora pre-orders go live
  • about:mozilla - Mobile Firefox, Weave, Data, Logos, FAQs and more…
  • “Linux Ahead” - - a new video podcast show on FOSS news
  • Critical hole in Mplayer
  • Open Source Census Tracks Enterprise Use of Open Source Globally

Open Source Census Finds FOSS Everywhere

Filed under
OSS

informationweek.com/blog: The Open Source Census, which I mentioned back in April, just dropped a press release this morning about the data it's been collecting. I chatted the day before with Kim Weins, senior VP of OpenLogic, a key co-sponsor of the census, and how they found a few ... surprises in the results.

Five programs you can afford in a financial meltdown

Filed under
Software

blogs.computerworld: No matter what happens to the bailout, it's a safe bet that times are going to be hard. So what can you do? The choice is clear: switch to open-source software. Like what you ask?

2001: A search odyssey

Filed under
Google

googleblog.blogspot: Now that we're a decade old, we figured we're long overdue for some spring cleaning. We started digging around our basement and found all kinds of junk: old Swedish fish, pigeon poop, Klingon translation books. Amazingly enough, hidden in a corner beneath Larry's and Sergey's original lab coats, we found a vintage search index in mint condition. We dusted it off and took it for a spin, gobsmacked to see how different the web was in early 2001.

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More in Tux Machines

Security News

Red Hat and Fedora

Technical
  • Red Hat Takes OpenShift Dedicated to Google Cloud Platform
    Red Hat has steadily taken significant steps in the cloud computing arena, expanding the focus of its OpenShift open source Platform-as-a-Service hybrid cloud computing offering, including launching a cloud-hosted commercial edition called OpenShift Online. Now, the company has announced the availability of OpenShift Dedicated on Google Cloud Platform. The new offering brings Red Hat’s container platform as a managed service offering to enterprise customers who want to build, launch, and manage applications on OpenShift Dedicated with Google Cloud Platform as their underlying cloud infrastructure. With the availability of OpenShift Dedicated on Google Cloud Platform, users can speed adoption of containers, Kubernetes, and cloud-native application patterns, according to Red Hat. Users also get access to Google’s global, container-optimized infrastructure and can more easily augment their applications with Google’s ecosystem of data analytics, machine learning, compute, network, and storage services.
  • Red Hat Launches OpenShift Dedicated on Google Cloud Platform
    Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE: RHT), the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today announced the general availability of OpenShift Dedicated on Google Cloud Platform. The new offering brings Red Hat’s award-winning container platform as a managed service offering to enterprise customers who want to build, launch, and manage applications on OpenShift Dedicated with Google Cloud Platform as their underlying cloud infrastructure. With the availability of OpenShift Dedicated on Google Cloud Platform, users can speed adoption of containers, Kubernetes, and cloud-native application patterns, benefiting from Red Hat’s deep enterprise experience. Users also benefit from Google’s global, container-optimized infrastructure and can more easily augment their applications with Google’s ecosystem of data analytics, machine learning, compute, network, and storage services.
  • Image Gallery: Synnex Cloud Catalyst Conference Featuring Red Hat, XMedius, Plantronics
Financial Fedora/Community
  • Fedora 23 End of Life
    With the recent release of Fedora 25, Fedora 23 will officially enter End Of Life (EOL) status on December 20th, 2016. After December 20th, all packages in the Fedora 23 repositories will no longer receive security, bugfix, or enhancement updates, and no new packages will be added to the Fedora 23 collection. Upgrading to Fedora 24 or Fedora 25 before December 20th 2016 is highly recommended for all users still running Fedora 23.
  • What Is Wayland and What Does It Means for Linux Users
    Fedora 25 is now out. People are buzzing, as the team have decided to make Wayland the default graphical session going forward. For many Linux users Wayland is a new term that has popped up, but one that they do not understand. In this article we’ll briefly go over what Wayland is, what it does, and why developers are flocking to it in droves! What exactly is Wayland? Let’s find out!
  • Korora 25 is Ready
    The Korora Project has released version 25 (codename "Gurgle") which is now available for download. As usual, you can find a list of already known problems at the common F25 bugs page.
  • Fedora Design Interns Update
  • Holiday Break 2016.
    It’s sad I don’t get more time to post here these days. Being a manager is a pretty busy job, although I have no complaints! It’s enjoyable, and fortunately I have one of the best teams imaginable to work with, the Fedora Engineering team.

openSUSE Says Goodbye to AMD/ATI Catalyst (fglrx) Proprietary Graphics Drivers

openSUSE developer Bruno Friedmann, informed the community of the openSUSE Linux operating system about the fact that he's planning to remove the old ATI/AMD Catalyst (also known as fglrx) proprietary graphics drivers. Read more

Maximizing the benefits of open source in IoT

With the dawn of the Internet of Things, software is making its way into every product, into every industry. And along with software come developers, who bring their beliefs, attitudes, expertise, and habits along with them. One of those is open source technology — a staple in the software industry since the 1980s, but a new and often scary concept for many traditional industries, whose businesses are built on protecting their assets and intellectual property. In this article, we will illustrate how open source technologies permeate every part of the IoT development stack, and outline how open source can be used as a means of market control as well as a booster of innovation and a way to tap into the IoT developer talent pool. The data have been collected from 3,700 IoT developers in 150 countries across the globe, surveyed in Q4 2015 and shines a light on how big a deal open source really is in IoT, why developers love it, and how companies can create a successful commercial strategy around the use of open source by aligning themselves with the values of that core stakeholder group that are developers. Read more