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Saturday, 23 Sep 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

How one Melburnian spent Software Freedom Day

Filed under
OSS

itwire.com: For most people in Melbourne, Saturday, September 20, was just another day for trying to recover from the excesses of the previous night, knocking back from work, lazing, and reading the newspapers on the web.

Microsoft FUD An Unfired Gun In Austin

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

linuxlock.blogspot: I along with about every other Linux blogger got all bunched up over Microsoft "training" Best Buytm, Office Depottm and Staplestm in the art of besmirching Linux.

From Windows to Linux - Ubuntu & Me

Filed under
Ubuntu

associatedcontent.com: I am a recent convert to Linux. I, like many others, was a die-hard fan of Windows. Anyway, last year I was having problems with my laptop -- So I decided to be daring and switch to Linux.

When Someone Says We Should NOT Use Linux..

Filed under
Linux

everyjoe.com: We must learn to research further when someone writes something like 3 reasons why we should not use Linux. Many people already responded to the post and have told the blogger the things that debunk his/her arguments. The blogger was too general about his/her comments about Linux.

Gnome 3 – A Quick Visual Tour

Filed under
Software

d0od.blogspot: Gnome 3, due for inclusion in Ubuntu 10.04, will mark the first radical change to the Gnome Desktop since it's inception thanks to it’s “new” interface ‘Gnome-Shell’.

Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter #160

Filed under
Ubuntu

Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue #160 for the week September 13th - Septenber 19th, 2009 is available.

WebGL support makes first appearance in latest Firefox 3.7 nightly builds

Filed under
Moz/FF

downloadsquad.com: Google Chrome and other WebKit-based browsers aren't the only ones getting improved 3D graphics handling capabilities. As of September 18th, Firefox trunk builds include support for WebGL.

The very first bug in Ubuntu... the most critical?

Filed under
Ubuntu

patchpanel.blogspot: A few days ago, just to do something, I wandered on launchpad.net putting my nose in the Ubuntu bug: it always gives me a good feeling to see how the faults are not hidden but rather exposed and solved with the help of the community ... one thing I like about Linux, absolutely.

This kind of Sugar is actually *good* for kids… Put an OLPC in your pocket with Sugar on a Stick.

Filed under
OLPC

A good friend of mine purchased an OLPC when they were first released. He wasn’t impressed with it, but I can’t say the same… Sugar on a Stick runs great on my old Eee PC 900, and is a lot more intuitive than you’d think, even for a grup!

read more...

Installing Cherokee With PHP5 And MySQL Support On Fedora 11

Filed under
HowTos

Cherokee is a very fast, flexible and easy to configure Web Server. It supports the widespread technologies nowadays: FastCGI, SCGI, PHP, CGI, TLS and SSL encrypted connections, virtual hosts, authentication, on the fly encoding, load balancing, Apache compatible log files, and much more.

Real-Time Earth Wallpaper

Filed under
Linux

We already wrote about a wallpaper application for Linux which displays the current weather, moon phases and time of day based on your current location, in real time. This time, I'm going to tell you about a script created by Claudio Novais @ Ubuntued which displays a picture of the Earth, in real time.

Get your game on in PCLinuxOS with djl

Filed under
Software

pclinuxonline.com: Djl is an open-source (GPL licensed) game manager written in Python 2.5 for the GNU/Linux Operating Systems. It is inspired by Valve’s Steam software for Windows.

RE : Please Reinstate the OS Wars

sinaisix.blogspot: In that post, he talked about how he would love to see another cold war between Linux and Windows. To put it bluntly, I simply disagree with the post.

Distribution Variation

Filed under
Linux

elevenislouder.blogspot: Recently, I stumbled upon a new Linux distribution aimed at the x86, general use, desktop microcomputer. Naturally, I had a bit of an urge to groan, moan, and otherwise throw a temper tantrum. The predisposition to loathe new Linux distributions is not based in a dislike of Linux distribution plurality, but more of a dislike for redundancy.

Quake Live - Redefining the online gaming

Filed under
Gaming

dedoimedo.com: Quake Live is a First Person Shooter game, very similar to many other Quake-based variants, an extremely popular and successful franchise of games developed by id Software. In fact, many Linux First Person Shooters are based on a variety of game engines, released as open-source by the company.

HP Pavillion dv2-1010ez Entertainment Notebook

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

zdnet.co.uk/blog: It came preloaded with Windows Vista Home Premium. You can imagine how thrilled I was with that. NOT. I then set about installing (or trying to install) various Linux distributions.

today's howtos & leftovers:

Filed under
News
HowTos
  • Install Picasa in Ubuntu with Google Linux Software Repositories
  • Add new hard disk to your Linux machine
  • Fun with the Linux seq command
  • HOWTO: Using CPU MSR tools (RDMSR,WRMSR) in Debian Linux
  • How to Set up a Wireless Network in Puppy Linux
  • How to See Linux TCP/UDP Network and Socket information
  • Fix nvidia 50 Hz Display Rate
  • Save your time with these handy Ubuntu tips
  • Force application windows to start centered on the screen
  • Three Simple Tips for Contributing to Open Source Projects
  • Linux Crazy Podcast 63: Gentoo Developer Jorge Manuel Vicetto (jmbsvicetto)
  • Feminism's dirty little secret
  • Firefox Cache Viewer Gui Frontend
  • Visual View of Your Firefox Web Search History With History Tree
  • Linux Outlaws 111 - Developers, Developers... D'oh!

Distro Review: SAM Linux 2009

Filed under
Linux

danlynch.org/blog: After some delay it’s finally time for me to write up my thoughts about SAM Linux 2009, a distro I must confess I hadn’t really heard of until someone asked me to review it. It’s a German distribution based on the very popular PCLinuxOS. So how would I get on with this unknown quantity (to me at least), read on to find out…

Linux and plethorization

Filed under
Linux

linuxjournal.com: Why is it that Linux distros divide and multiply? And do we have a better name for how and why that's done than, say, "forking"?

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More in Tux Machines

OpenSUSE fonts – The sleeping beauty guide

Pandora’s box of fonts is one of the many ailments of the distro world. As long as we do not have standards, and some rather strict ones at that, we will continue to suffer from bad fonts, bad contrast, bad ergonomics, and in general, settings that are not designed for sustained, prolonged use. It’s a shame, because humans actually use computers to interface with information, to READ text and interpret knowledge using the power of language. It’s the most critical element of the whole thing. OpenSUSE under-delivers on two fonts – anti-aliasing and hinting options that are less than ideal, and then it lacks the necessary font libraries to make a relevant, modern and pleasing desktop for general use. All of this can be easily solved if there’s more attention, love and passion for the end product. After all, don’t you want people to be spending a lot of time interacting, using and enjoying the distro? Hopefully, one day, all this will be ancient history. We will be able to choose any which system and never worry or wonder how our experience is going to be impacted by the choice of drivers, monitors, software frameworks, or even where we live. For the time being, if you intend on using openSUSE, this little guide should help you achieve a better, smoother, higher-quality rendering of fonts on the screen, allowing you to enjoy the truly neat Plasma desktop to the fullest. Oh, in the openSUSE review, I promised we would handle this, and handle it we did! Take care. Read more

Today in Techrights

Direct Rendering Manager and VR HMDs Under Linux

  • Intel Prepping Support For Huge GTT Pages
    Intel OTC developers are working on support for huge GTT pages for their Direct Rendering Manager driver.
  • Keith Packard's Work On Better Supporting VR HMDs Under Linux With X.Org/DRM
    Earlier this year Keith Packard started a contract gig for Valve working to improve Linux's support for virtual reality head-mounted displays (VR HMDs). In particular, working on Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) and X.Org changes needed so VR HMDs will work well under Linux with the non-NVIDIA drivers. A big part of this work is the concept of DRM leases, a new Vulkan extension, and other changes to the stack.

Software: Security Tools, cmus, Atom-IDE, Skimmer Scanner

  • Security Tools to Check for Viruses and Malware on Linux
    First and foremost, no operating system is 100 percent immune to attack. Whether a machine is online or offline, it can fall victim to malicious code. Although Linux is less prone to such attacks than, say, Windows, there is no absolute when it comes to security. I have witnessed, first hand, Linux servers hit by rootkits that were so nasty, the only solution was to reinstall and hope the data backup was current. I’ve been a victim of a (very brief) hacker getting onto my desktop, because I accidentally left desktop sharing running (that was certainly an eye opener). The lesson? Even Linux can be vulnerable. So why does Linux need tools to prevent viruses, malware, and rootkits? It should be obvious why every server needs protection from rootkits — because once you are hit with a rootkit, all bets are off as to whether you can recover without reinstalling the platform. It’s antivirus and anti-malware where admins start getting a bit confused. Let me put it simply — if your server (or desktop for that matter) makes use of Samba or sshfs (or any other sharing means), those files will be opened by users running operating systems that are vulnerable. Do you really want to take the chance that your Samba share directory could be dishing out files that contain malicious code? If that should happen, your job becomes exponentially more difficult. Similarly, if that Linux machine performs as a mail server, you would be remiss to not include AV scanning (lest your users be forwarding malicious mail).
  • cmus – A Small, Fast And Powerful Console Music Player For Linux
    You may ask a question yourself when you see this article. Is it possible to listen music in Linux terminal? Yes because nothing is impossible in Linux. We have covered many popular GUI-based media players in our previous articles but we didn’t cover any CLI based media players as of now, so today we are going to cover about cmus, is one of the famous console-based media players among others (For CLI, very few applications is available in Linux).
  • You Can Now Transform the Atom Hackable Text Editor into an IDE with Atom-IDE
    GitHub and Facebook recently launched a set of tools that promise to allow you to transform your Atom hackable text editor into a veritable IDE (Integrated Development Environment). They call the project Atom-IDE. With the release of Atom 1.21 Beta last week, GitHub introduced Language Server Protocol support to integrate its brand-new Atom-IDE project, which comes with built-in support for five popular language servers, including JavaScript, TypeScript, PHP, Java, C#, and Flow. But many others will come with future Atom updates.
  • This open-source Android app is designed to detect nearby credit card skimmers
    Protecting our data is a constant battle, especially as technology continues to advance. A recent trend that has popped up is the installation of credit card skimmers, especially at locations such as gas pumps. With a simple piece of hardware and 30 seconds to install it, a hacker can easily steal credit card numbers from a gas pump without anyone knowing. Now, an open-source app for Android is attempting to help users avoid these skimmers.