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Wednesday, 20 Sep 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 26/07/2014 - 4:38pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 26/07/2014 - 1:23pm
Story Leftovers: Games Roy Schestowitz 26/07/2014 - 1:23pm
Story GOG's Mistaken Giveaway, Ubuntu 14.04.1 LTS, and Wayland in KDE Rianne Schestowitz 26/07/2014 - 6:03am
Story Autonomous sub powers up with Wheezy on Haswell Rianne Schestowitz 26/07/2014 - 12:24am
Story KDE Ships Third Beta of Applications and Platform 4.14 Rianne Schestowitz 25/07/2014 - 8:47pm
Story Wireless speakers stream audio from web and WLAN Rianne Schestowitz 25/07/2014 - 8:43pm
Story GNOME 3.13.4 released Rianne Schestowitz 25/07/2014 - 7:44pm
Story Guix 0.7 Can Now Install The GNU Operating System Rianne Schestowitz 25/07/2014 - 7:40pm
Story The security flaws in Tails Linux are not its only problem Rianne Schestowitz 25/07/2014 - 7:19pm

Ubuntu Intrepid Alpha 2 released

Filed under
Ubuntu

A Little Linux and Unix Humor - Error Messages

Filed under
Humor

linuxshellaccount.blogspot: For this weekend, I went trolling around looking for something funny (because not enough funny things happen to me at work) and I found this great list of 189 Funny Error Messages. They're tagged under Unix but some of them are definitely MainFrame/IBM or Linux errors.

Linux in schools: a teacher speaks

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: Catching them young is a popular slogan and one that yields dividends too, no matter whether one applies it to the adoption of software or the learning of a language. And with a small window seemingly open for Australia's FOSS community to push for the use of free and open source software in schools, the question arises - how does one go about making the first inroads?

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Shuttleworth's Ubuntu Ambitions: Challenge the Mac

  • Elive
  • Sabayon 3.5
  • Xandros buys Linspire – What does it mean for Linux?
  • Is Linux ready for your Small Business?
  • Linux web tools, Pt. 5
  • Open source and hiring: Is NZ behind the times?
  • Resource Monitor In Ubuntu Hardy Heron
  • Effective use of Software Repositories on openSUSE 11.0
  • Chris DiBona, Open Source Program Manager, Google
  • WINE 1.1.1 Released, New Improvements
  • Growing demand for Linux - Novell SA
  • UK at bottom of open source adoption league
  • Did Hans Reiser's lawyer know he was guilty?

POHMELFS Encryption

Filed under
Linux

kerneltrap.org: Evgeniy Polyakov announced the latest release of his Parallel Optimized Host Message Exchange Layered File System, POHMELFS. He noted that the big new feature in this release is strong crypto support.

Does Linux wonder about an Apple netbook?

Filed under
Linux

blogs.the451group: When it gets down to it, netbooks today tend to run one of two operating systems: Linux or Windows. While there is variety and new development on the Linux side - the Windows side is characterized by that oh so familiar yet aging OS, Windows XP, recently ‘retired’ by Microsoft.

KDE and GNOME to Co-locate Flagship Conferences on Gran Canaria in 2009

Filed under
Software

dot.kde.org: The KDE e.V. and GNOME Foundation today announced that they will hold their yearly conferences, Akademy and GUADEC in 2009 in Gran Canaria. The conferences will be separate events, but co-located and hosted by the same organizers, the Cabildo of Gran Canaria and its Secretary of Tourism, Technological Innovation and Foreign Trade.

KDE on KDE 4.0

Filed under
KDE

groklaw.net: There has been a bit of a dustup about KDE 4.0. A lot of opinions have been expressed, but I thought you might like to hear from KDE. So I wrote to them and asked if they'd be willing to explain their choices and answer the main complaints. They graciously agreed.

Mandriva Linux Community Newsletter #129

Filed under
MDV

mandriva.com: Welcome to the Mandriva Linux Community Newsletter - dedicated to keeping you up-to-date with the latest Mandriva-related news & info. This time we cover the new Mandriva Flash release, an interesting research project, Mandriva in Nicaragua, and more.

KDE 4.1 Beta 1 on opensusEEE

Filed under
KDE

bushweed.blogspot: So, when i moved to Rotterdam the only computer i brought was my EEE. i thought, let me actually do what south african internet speeds held me back from. So i installed the latest KDE 4 beta. Using openSUSE 10.3...

Ubuntu on TM

In memoriam: Linux evangelist and Linux.com editor Joe Barr

Filed under
Linux
Obits

linux.com: Our colleague Joe Barr sometimes described himself as a doddering old geek. Many knew him as a Linux evangelist; others knew him from his ham radio activities. And those of us who worked with Joe knew him in all of his sometime irascible, often funny moods. Joe was always one of our favorite people, and we are devastated to report that he died at home, unexpectedly, last night.

Brian Proffitt Joins Linux Foundation as LDN Community Manager

Filed under
Interviews
OSS

ostatic.com: After a long search, the Linux Foundation has found its community manager for its LSB Developer Network. The Linux Foundation has tapped Brian Proffitt, longtime managing editor of Linux Today, Enterprise Linux Today, AllLinuxDevices, LinuxPR, and JustLinux.

Patent violation, prosecution, acquisition: pick your top open-source project

Filed under
OSS

theregister.co.uk: The world of open source gets the equivalent of an Oscar awards ceremony later this month when code-host SourceForge announces the winners of its second-annual vote on the community's top projects.

Finally, Notes on Linux is here and ready

Filed under
Software

techworld.com.au/blog: Two years. Can you believe it's been two years to the day since IBM first released a native Lotus Notes client for Linux? Where did version 7.x go in that time? Pretty much nowhere. With an installation process like this, I wonder why.

Mandriva Corporate Desktop (what about it?)

Filed under
MDV

beranger.org: There was a recent discussion on the French Mandriva forum, about a possible free LTS version of Mandriva. Someone mentioned the Corporate Desktop and Corporate Server line — a paying one, à la RHEL and SLED/SLES. The only problem is that Mandriva Corporate Desktop is dead. It was killed using a silencer though.

some howtos & roundups:

Filed under
HowTos
  • How-To: Create CD/DVD ISO Images with K3b

  • 15 Minutes to a sweet Ubuntu install which can coexist with Windows
  • Howto: Gentoo Guest OS in VirtualBox
  • Using Screen, Script, Mkfifo And Redirection To Watch Or Log User Sessions
  • Flash not working with Firefox openSUSE 11.0
  • Fix JAVA plugin in Hardy Firefox
  • Howto Starting and Stopping Ubuntu
  • Make Ubuntu Faster and Smoother
  • Apps to View HTML files from Console
  • 4 Apps to Rip DVDs on Linux

Review: Acer Aspire One notebook computer

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

computeractive.co.uk: Miniature notebooks, which do all the jobs of full-sized ones but with slightly less power, seem to be the order of the day in 2008. The One looks smart, with a white case and shiny black bezel around the 9in 1,024x600 pixel screen.

SliTaz, a mighty micro Linux distro

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: SliTaz is a new micro GNU/Linux live distribution designed to run from RAM (a recommended minimum of 128MB) and installable to a hard drive or USB device. The current version, SliTaz 1.0, weighs in at a light 24.8MB and provides a nice selection of applications that run on a lightweight desktop.

Distro Review: Linux Mint 5 Elyssa

Filed under
Linux

adventuresinopensource.blogspot: Well it's review time again and today's candidate is Linux Mint 5. I say today's candidate but really I should say this months candidate as I ended up spending a lot more time on Mint than I'd planned. I really liked Mint 4 and gave it a rave review last year, so this new version would have to work hard to impress me, after 3 weeks with it on and off how does it stack up? Here goes...

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More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Linux-driven Sitara SiP module shrinks to 21mm square

Octavo’s OSD335x-SM is a 40 percent smaller version of its AM335x-based OSD335x SiP that adds a 4KB EEPROM. There’s also a compact, open-spec dev board. Last year, Octavo Systems added a new twist to BeagleBone development when it released its 27 x 27mm OSD335x System-In-Package (SiP) module. The OSD335x, which went on to form the basis of the BeagleBone Black Wireless and BeagleBone Blue SBCs, packs a Texas Instruments Sitara AM335x SoC and nearly all the functions of a BeagleBone Black SBC into a BGA module. Octavo has now followed up with a 40 percent smaller OSD335x-SM variant that measures 21 x 21mm (441 sq. mm). Read more

today's leftovers

  • Black screen of death after Win10 update? Microsoft blames HP
    Microsoft is pointing the finger of blame at HP's factory image for black screens of death appearing after a Windows Update. Scores of PC owners took to the HP forums last week to report that Windows 10 updates released September 12 were slowing down the login process. Users stated that once they downloaded the updates and entered their username and password, they only saw black screens for about five to 10 minutes. The forum members said that clean installs or disabling a service called "app readiness", which "gets apps ready for use the first time a user signs in to this PC and when adding new apps" seemed to fix the delay. Today, a Microsoft spokesperson told The Register: "We're working to resolve this as soon as possible" and referred affected customers to a new support post.
  • GNOME 3.26 Released! Check Out the New Features
    GNOME 3.26 is the latest version of GNOME 3 released six months after the last stable release GNOME 3.24. The release, code-named “Manchester”, is the 33rd stable release of the free, open-source desktop.
  • Arch Arch and away! What's with the Arch warriors?
    If you choose to begin your Linux adventures with Arch Linux after trying Ubuntu for a month, you're probably doing it wrong. If there's a solid reason why you think Arch is for you; awesome! Do it. You will learn new things. A lot of new things. But hey, what's the point in learning what arch-chroot does if you can't figure out what sudo is or what wpa_supplicant does?
  • Setting a primary monitor for launching games in a dual monitor rig
  • AMD Zen Temperature Monitoring On Linux Is Working With Hwmon-Next
    If you want CPU temperature monitoring to work under Linux for your Ryzen / Threadripper / EPYC processor(s), it's working on hwmon-next. The temperature monitoring support didn't make it for Linux 4.14 but being published earlier this month were finally patches for Zen temperature monitoring by extending the k10temp Linux driver.
  • Fanless Skylake computer offers four PCI and PCIe slots
    Adlink’s MVP-6010 and MVP-6020 embedded computers run Linux or Windows on Intel 6th Gen CPUs, and offer 4x PCI/PCIe slots, 6x USB ports, and 4x COM ports. If Adlink’s new MVP-6010/6020 Series looks familiar, that’s because it’s a modified version of the recent MVP-5000 and last year’s MVP-6000 industrial PCs. The top half appears to be identical, with the same ports, layout, and Intel 6th Gen Core “Skylake” TE series processors. Like the MVP-6000, it adds a PCI and PCIe expansion unit on the bottom, but whereas the MVP-6000 had two slots, the MVP-6010 and MVP-6020 have four.
  • How Qi wireless charging works, and why it hasn’t taken over yet
    Qi has been an Android staple for a while, and now it’s coming to iPhones, too.
  • W3C DRM appeal fails, votes kept secret
    Earlier this summer, the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) — the organization responsible for defining the standards that make up the Web — decided to embrace DRM (aka "EME") as a web standard. I wasn’t happy about this. I don’t know many who were. Shortly after that, the W3C agreed to talk with me about the issue. During that discussion, I encouraged the W3C to increase their level of transparency going forward — and if there is an appeal of their DRM decision, to make that process completely open and visible to the public (including how individual members of the W3C vote on the issue). The appeal happened and has officially ended. I immediately reached out to the W3C to gather some details. What I found out was highly concerning. I’ll include the most interesting bits below, as un-edited as possible.

Red Hat News