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Sunday, 04 Dec 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

MEPIS 7.0 Beta1 is Available For Testing

Filed under
Linux

mepis.org: MEPIS has announced the upload of the first official Beta of the upcoming 7.0 release of SimplyMEPIS. Version 6.9.60beta1 for 32 and 64 bit processors is available from the testing directory at the MEPIS subscriber site and the MEPIS public mirrors.

Turn Apache into a collaborative authoring platform with mod_dav

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Ever thought about how nice it would be if you could edit the files stored on your Web server directly without the cumbersome download-edit-upload routine? Web-based Distributed Authoring and Versioning (WebDAV) is the way to do it.

sudo changes, the good way

Filed under
Software

beranger: As "potentially dangerous" is a more or less infinite set these days, OpenBSD 4.2 will get a better approach to sudo.

Gutsy and openSUSE 10.3 Beta1: Part2

Filed under
Ubuntu

laserjock.wordpress: The response to my first post was pretty overwhelming. I’ve got a little bit more openSUSE experience under my belt and wanted to talk a bit more about Gutsy:

graphical disk usage and statistics using filelight

Filed under
Software

vertito.blogspot: We all know most user's desktop runs and boots operating system from their harddisk. Simply from a harddisk, which is usually composed of files and folders. But trying to think how these data are scattered out or organized and logically located without overwriting each other and knowing where the other sector part ends and continued from your harddisk would be almost impossible for an average desktop user like me! And the light shows up.

early bird howtos

Filed under
HowTos
  • How To Configure Apt Sources.List - For Complete Newbies

  • Howto setup a print server for Windows (and others) using CUPS and zeroconf
  • Generating md5 encrypted password for chpasswd

Virgin America migrates to Red Hat Linux

Filed under
Linux

computerweekly: The website has selected Red Hat Enterprise Linux as the platform to support the website, after previously using the less scalable Red Hat-sponsored Fedora open-source solution.

Also: Linux security holes identified

Two tools for enabling wireless cards

Filed under
Software

linux.com: No other hardware nowadays supports GNU/Linux as weakly as wireless network adapters. Between the constant release of new models and major vendors who are uninterested in supporting the operating system, free drivers for wireless cards are next to impossible to reverse engineer. Nor can you find many retailers willing to customize laptops as readily as they do workstations. In this situation, ndiswrapper and the Broadcom firmware cutter provide a functional, if not always satisfactory, solution.

Ubuntu 7.04 (feisty) on a Thinkpad T61P

Filed under
Ubuntu

Michael R Head: Finally got Ubuntu running on the T61P (which has assumed the name of my last laptop which is in the process of having the contents of its hard drive transplanted). I encountered some issues in the process of doing this.

Could Linux become the dominant OS?

Filed under
Linux

the register: The trends suggest that Linux will become the dominant OS - the commodity OS - both for the PC and the server, to the eventual detriment of Microsoft's revenues.

Linux text editors: Do any make the grade?

Filed under
Software

computerworld: Linux buffs tend to scoff at one of the major reasons that Windows users like me haven't switched yet: We don't want to give up our favorite applications. With countless open-source options, plus a rising number of commercial apps for Linux, their argument goes, we can certainly find a replacement for whatever software we're running on XP or Vista. But, Linux fans, it's not so simple.

Bruce Perens Declines 60 Minutes Interview

Filed under
Reiser

technocrat.net: 60 Minutes called yesterday regarding the Hans Reiser story - Reiser is a brilliant filesystem developer and is about to go to trial.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • How can I make dd give me a progress report?

  • Linux Testers Wanted for EVE Online
  • Red Hat in talks with states for open source solution
  • Is Open-Source A Business Model? $500 Million Says It Is
  • An Interview with Matt Asay
  • MIT’s ‘$100 laptops’ to go to Pacific islands
  • Xandros dance with Microsoft turns to a smooch
  • What made Kevin’s jaw hit the floor today?

Minty Dell(icious)

Filed under
Linux

Steve Carl (bmc blogs): Success with one Dell leads to trying another. The "old" Dell also runs Linux like it was made for it. Oh. Wait. Linux is made for almost everything.

Debian GNU/Linux 4.0 updated

Filed under
Linux

debian.net: The Debian project has updated the stable distribution Debian GNU/Linux 4.0 (codename Etch). This update adds security updates to the stable release, together with a few corrections to serious problems.

Manage your photos with digiKam

Filed under
HowTos

freesoftware mag: It’s been said that for a free software desktop to succeed it needs to address the needs of the average home user. Managing digital photographs is just one of those needs. Let’s see how one of the more popular free software photo management applications, digiKam, measures up.

KDE 4: cursor themes, LinuxMCE, some impressions

Filed under
KDE

liquidat: Current KDE 4 SVN has an improvement that makes it possible to change the cursor theme without re-starting X. Also, the LinuxMCE team now officially cooperates with KDE to merge technology where it makes sense. I also took some general KDE 4 screenshots to gather some impressions.

Also: Raptor Menu flip Effect

Linux: Moving 4K Stacks Forward

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: In a series of 5 patches, Jesper Juhl propsed moving 4K stacks from a debug feature to a non-debug feature, defaulting it to be enabled in the -mm tree.

Information sharing at the NSA (video)

Filed under
Misc

linux.com: The topic of information sharing among US intelligence agencies, the FBI, and other federal agencies has attracted attention since 9/11. At Defcon XV, I had the opportunity to ask Tony Sager, chief of the National Security Agency's Vulnerability Analysis and Operations Group, about information sharing within the agency.

Linux Mint Takes on a KDE Flavor

Filed under
Linux

desktoplinux: Linux Mint, a community Linux distribution that includes some proprietary elements for a better "out of the box" user experience, is now available in an edition with KDE as its desktop environment.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Gaming

Leftovers: Software

  • Hyper Is a Terminal Emulator Built Using Web Technologies
    A lot of us use the terminal on Ubuntu, typically from an app like GNOME Terminal, Xterm or an app like Guake. But did you know that there’s an JS/HTML/CSS Terminal? It’s called Hyper (formerly/also known as HyperTerm, though it has no relation to the Windows terminal of the same/similar name) and, usefulness aside, it’s certainl a novel proof-of-concept. “The goal of the project,” according to the official website, “is to create a beautiful and extensible experience for command-line interface users, built on open web standards.”
  • Little Kids Having Fun With “Terminal Train” In Ubuntu Linux
    Linux is often stereotyped as the operating system for tech savvy users and developers. However, there are some fun Linux commands that one can use in spare time. A small utility named sl can be installed in Linux to play with the Terminal Train.
  • This Cool 8-Bit Desktop Wallpaper Changes Throughout The Day
    Do you want a dynamic desktop wallpaper that changes throughout the day and looks like the sort of environment you’d be able to catchPokemon in? If so, check out Bit Day wallpapers. Created by Redditor user ~BloodyMarvelous, Bit Day is a collection of 12 high-resolution pixel art wallpapers.
  • This Script Sets Wallpapers from Imgur As Your Desktop Background
    Pyckground is a simple python script that can fetch a new desktop background on the Cinnamon desktop from any Imgur gallery you want. I came across it while doing a bit of background on the Bit Day wallpaper pack, and though it was nifty enough to be of use to some of you. So how does it work?
  • Productivity++
    In keeping with tradition of LTS aftermaths, the upcoming Plasma 5.9 release – the next feature release after our first Long Term Support Edition – will be packed with lots of goodies to help you get even more productive with Plasma!
  • Core Apps Hackfest 2016: report
    I spent last weekend at the Core Apps Hackfest in Berlin. The agenda was to work on GNOME’s core applications: Documents, Files, Music, Photos, Videos, Usage, etc.; to raise their overall standard and to make them push beyond the limits of the framework. There were 19 of us and among us we covered a wide range of modules and areas of expertise. I spent most of my time on the plumbing necessary for Documents and Photos to use GtkFlowBox and GtkListBox. The innards of Photos had already been overhauled to reduce its dependency on GtkTreeModel. Going into the hackfest we were sorely lacking a widget that had all the bells and whistles we need — the idiomatic GNOME 3 selection mode, and seamlessly switching between a list and grid view. So, this is where I decided to focus my energy. As a result, we now have a work-in-progress GdMainBox widget in libgd to replace the old GtkIconView/GtkTreeView-based GdMainView.

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • Did Amazon Just Kill Open Source?
    Back in the days, we used to focus on creating modular architectures. We had standard wire protocols like NFS, RPC, etc. and standard API layers like BSD, POSIX, etc. Those were fun days. You could buy products from different vendors, they actually worked well together and were interchangeable. There were always open source implementations of the standard, but people could also build commercial variations to extend functionality or durability. The most successful open source project is Linux. We tend to forget it has very strict APIs and layers. New kernel implementations must often be backed by official standards (USB, SCSI…). Open source and commercial implementations live happily side by side in Linux. If we contrast Linux with the state of open source today, we see so many implementations which overlap. Take the big data eco-systems as an example: in most cases there are no standard APIs, or layers, not to mention standard wire protocols. Projects are not interchangeable, causing a much worse lock-in than when using commercial products which conform to a common standard.
  • Firebird 3 by default in LibreOffice 5.4 (Base)
    Lots of missing features & big bugs were fixed recently . All of the blockers that were initially mentioned on tracking bug are now fixed.
  • Linux & Open Source News Of The Week — Comma.ai, Patches For Firefox and Tor, And OSS-Fuzz
  • Open Source Malaria helps students with proof of concept toxoplasmosis pill
    A team of Australian student researchers at Sydney Grammar School has managed to recreate the formula for Daraprim, the drug made (in)famous by the actions of Turing Pharmaceuticals last year when it increased the price substantially per pill. According to Futurism, the undertaking was helped along by an, “online research-sharing platform called Open Source Malaria [OSM], which aims to use publicly available drugs and medical techniques to treat malaria.” The students’ pill passed a battery of tests for purity, and ultimately cost $2 using different, more readily available components. It shows the potential of the platform, which has said elsewhere there is, “enormous potential to crowdsource new potential medicines efficiently.” Although Daraprim is already around, that it could be synthesized relatively easily without the same materials as usual is a good sign for OSM.
  • Growing the Duke University eNable chapter
    We started the Duke University eNable chapter with the simple mission of providing amputees in the Durham area of North Carolina with alternative prostheses, free of cost. Our chapter is a completely student-run organization that aims to connect amputees with 3D printed prosthetic devices. We are partnered with the Enable Community Foundation (ECF), a non-profit prosthetics organization that works with prosthetists to design and fit 3D printed prosthetic devices on amputees who are in underserved communities. As an official ECF University Chapter, we represent the organization in recipient outreach, and utilize their open sourced designs for prosthetic devices.

today's howtos