Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Wednesday, 21 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Mozilla chief John Lilly is fired up about making a better Web browser

Filed under
Moz/FF

latimes.com: Reporting from San Francisco -- The gig:Chief executive of Mozilla Corp., maker of the Firefox Web browser, which broke Microsoft Corp.'s hold on the market so that it couldn't dominate the Internet the way it does computer operating systems.

Another Reason to Run GNU/Linux...

Filed under
Linux

opendotdotdot.blogspot: The Home Office has quietly adopted a new plan to allow police across Britain routinely to hack into people’s personal computers without a warrant. So why might GNU/Linux help?

Samung NC10 Netbook

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

phoronix.com: It seems that each and every week there are new netbooks that are introduced, but there are not many differences between most models. However, one of the latest companies to join the netbook bandwagon here in the United States has been Samsung with the introduction of the NC10. Is there anything special about it?

Also: My First Netbook Experience

Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter #123

Filed under
Ubuntu

ubuntu.com: The Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue #123 for the week of December 21st- January 3rd, 2009 is now available.

An Inconvenient OS Truth

Filed under
Linux

blogbeebe.blogspot: This post has been in the making since mid-December, when I came across one of the most outrageously titled posts on a professional web publication that I think I've ever read: "Dumbass consumers squander netbook experience by rejecting Linux."

First Impressions: Sabayon Linux Four Oh!

Filed under
Linux

ruminations: Two years ago I ran into Sabayon Linux for the first time. Version 3.2 was about to be released and I gave Sabayon a spin on my laptop. I wasn’t very lucky with later releases which simply refused to be installed. Two weeks ago Sabayon Linux Four Oh! was released. How far did Sabayon progress over the last two years?

Penguin Awareness Day - January 20th, 2009

Filed under
Linux

Jon maddog Hall: While "Penguin Awareness Day" officially has little to do with Linux, there is really no reason why we could not use this day to make people aware of our favorite operating system and Free Software in general.

Sidux Linux with LXDE - First Impressions

Filed under
Linux

saigonnezumi.com: I have been wanting to try out Sidux Linux for a long time. I have tested it but since it only comes with the KDE and XFCE window managers, I never used beyond the testing phase. Then about two weeks ago, Mario Behling, who I met through FOSS Bridge here in Vietnam, introduced me to LXDE.

Ubuntu 8.10 - It’s Great But With A Couple Of Problems

Filed under
Ubuntu

blog.programmerslog.com: I am in the process of making my desktop computer into a work computer by removing Windows XP and going down the Ubuntu (8.10 Intrepid Ibex) route. I thought I’d share some of the problems I had.

Smokin' Guns stand alone game released

Filed under
Gaming

linux-gamers.net: The Smokin' Guns game started its life under the name of Western Quake³. It was originally developed by a team known as Iron Claw Interactive. They released WQ3 beta 2.0 in 2003, after which development all but ceased. With the release of the stand alone version in 2008, the game was renamed to Smokin' Guns,

7 Best Free/Open-source Backup Software for Linux

Filed under
Software

junauza.com: If you are using Linux, there are plenty of backup software to choose from. I have here a list of some of the best free and open source backup software that you may want to check out.

The Rewriting of Open Source History

Filed under
OSS

seekingalpha.com: The open source blogosphere featured two articles the last week of December 2008 that inaccurately draw software-market history timelines from which the authors then inaccurately position the place of open source software in the information technology (IT) market. I doubt if the statements are intentionally misleading; they are most likely the result of ignorance or sloppiness.

KDE 4.1 across Linux distributions

Filed under
KDE

reformedmusings.wordpress: I saw some comments on a Linux board recently about KDE 4.1. They said that Kubuntu did a poor job of integrating KDE because Ubuntu with Gnome is the Canonical flagship and that’s where most of the effort goes. That peaked my curiosity.

Speed up Firefox by mounting the profile in tmpfs

Filed under
Linux

tmpfs is a virtual, RAM-backed filesystem. It’s lightning-fast, making tmpfs a viable choice for your profile directory. This document gives some tips on how to mount your Firefox profile in a tmpfs partition while minimizing the downsides of tmpfs.

Blackberry tethering (and more) on Linux

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
MDV
SUSE
Ubuntu

This article explains how to tether a Blackberry phone - use it as a modem, via a USB cable - in Linux, covering Mandriva, Ubuntu, OpenSUSE and Fedora. It also mentions some other things that the Barry project lets you do with your Blackberry.

few odds & ends

Filed under
News
  • tellico: collection manager for books, videos, music, and a whole lot more

  • New Features in GTK+ 2.15.0
  • Giving life back to an OLD laptop
  • Run Compiz Fusion on Your Mini 9
  • small tip - Which applications are using a given directory
  • FLOSS Weekly #50: Open MPI

Resolutions and mean people

Filed under
Linux

castrojo.wordpress: I am going to follow this guy’s saga on switching to Ubuntu for a week. I like his writing style and sarcastic sense of humor. However I found the responses to his problems to be all too common these days.

The For And The Against For Linux

Filed under
Linux

informationweek.com/blog: Two responses to things I've written recently are worth commenting on. Both were responses to my post about Windows 7 being more of a previous-version-of-Windows-killer than a Linux-killer -- and both bring up further points to be argued and defended.

7 Reasons Why Pirates Should Jump Ship to Open Source

Filed under
OSS

It has always amazed me how many people pirate. As the well-known anti-piracy video clip says, “You wouldn’t steal a car, you wouldn’t steal a handbag,” but people do regularly steal software and other copyrighted materials. They seem to have an innate belief that software should be free.

Technically, pirates don’t steal - they infringe copyright. Neither do they rape, pillage, sink ships, or make people walk the plank into shark-infested waters. The “pirate” label seems to be part of an unsuccessful campaign to encourage people to pay for intellectual property. Calling people names rarely works.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Events: OpenStack Summit Vancouver, IBM Index, Eclipse CheConf 2018

  • OpenStack Summit Vancouver '18: Vote for Speakers
    The next OpenStack Summit takes place again in Vancouver (BC, Canada), May 21-25, 2018. The "Vote for Presentations" period started. All proposals are up for community votes. The deadline for your vote is will end February 25 at 11:59pm PST (February 26th at 8:59am CET)
  • IBM Index: A Community Event for Open Source Developers
    The first-ever INDEX community event, happening now in San Francisco, is an open developer conference featuring sessions on topics including artificial intelligence, machine learning, analytics, cloud native, containers, APIs, languages, and more.
  • Eclipse CheConf 2018 – Join the live stream February 21st at 10 am EST
    2017 was a fantastic year for the Che project, with more contributors, more commits, and more usage – this solidified Che’s position as the leading developer workspace server and browser IDE. Eclipse Che users logged over 7 million hours of public Che usage (plus more in private installs). We’ll discuss the growing cloud development market, Che’s position in it, and the exciting changes we’re planning for 2018.

Kernel News and Linux Foundation

  • Linux Kernel Module Growth
    The Linux kernel grows at an amazing pace, each kernel release adds more functionality, more drivers and hence more kernel modules. I recently wondered what the trend was for kernel module growth per release, so I performed module builds on kernels v2.6.24 through to v4.16-rc2 for x86-64 to get a better idea of growth rates...
  • A Linux Kernel Driver Is Being Worked On For Valve's Steam Controller
    Right now to make most use of the Steam Controller on Linux you need to be using the Steam client while there have been independent user-space programs like SC-Controller to enable Steam Controller functionality without the Steam client running. A new and independent effort is a Linux kernel driver for the Steam Controller. Through reverse-engineering, Rodrigo Rivas Costa has been developing a kernel driver for the Valve Steam Controller. This driver supports both USB cable and USB wireless adapters for the Steam Controller. This driver is being developed as a proper HID kernel driver so it should work with all existing Linux programs and doesn't require the use of the proprietary Steam client.
  • AT&T Puts Smart City IoT 'Edge' Computing On Direct Dial
  • Linux Foundation, AT&T Launch Akraino

Red Hat News and New Fedora 27 Live ISOs

Software: funny-manpages, Nginx, Cockpit and More

  • Have a Laugh With Funny Linux Man Pages
    There is a package unsurprisingly called funny-manpages and it adds some witty entries to the man pages.
  • HTTP/2 Server Push Directives Land in Nginx 1.13.9
    The open source Nginx 1.13.9 web server debuted today, providing support for a new HTTP/2 standard feature known as Server Push. The HTTP/2 web standard was completed three years ago in February 2015, with Nginx ahead of the curve in terms of HTTP/2 standard adoption. The NGINX Plus R7 release in September 2015 featured the first commercially supported enterprise-grade support provided by Nginx for HTTP/2.
  • Cockpit 162
    Cockpit is the modern Linux admin interface. We release regularly. Here are the release notes from version 162.
  • 6 Best Linux Music Players That Every User Must Try — (2018 Edition)
    Watching movies and playing music is one of the primary entertainment purposes served by our computers. So, when you move to a new operating system, it makes perfect sense if you look for useful media players. In the past, we’ve already told you about the best video players for Linux and, in this article, we’ll be telling you about the best music players for Linux-based operating systems. Let’s take a look at them:
  • CPod (formerly Cumulonimbus) – A Beautiful Podcast App
    Today, we introduce a somewhat new podcast application that is simple and yet delivers efficiently across all 3 desktop platforms. CPod, (formerly known as Cumulonimbus), is an electron-based podcast app player for audiobook and podcast lovers.
  • Apper 1.0.0 is out!
    Apper the package/apps manager based on PackageKit has got it’s 1.0.0 version on it’s 10th birthday!
  • VidCutter – Quickly Trim and Join Video Clips
    VidCutter is an open-source cross-platform video editor with which you can quickly trim and join video clips. It is Python and Qt5-based, uses FFmpeg for its encoding and decoding operations, and it supports all the popular video formats not excluding FLV, MP4, AVI, and MOV. VidCutter boasts a customizable User Interface that you can personalize using themes and a plethora of settings that you can tweak to make your video editing environment more appealing.
  • Weblate 2.19.1
  • Tusk Evernote Client Updated, Is Now Available as a Snap
    The Tusk Evernote client is now available as a Snap. We spotlighted the unofficial Evernote app last year, finding that it added to and improved on the standard Evernote web app in a number of ways.