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About Tux Machines

Wednesday, 21 Mar 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Android continues to increase its market share at others’ expenseby Rianne Schestowitz 27/01/2015 - 9:03pm
Story Real-time enabled Sitara SoC shows up on a COM Rianne Schestowitz 27/01/2015 - 8:58pm
Story High-end 'upstream' Linux laptop plans to ship in April Roy Schestowitz 27/01/2015 - 8:57pm
Story Android essentials: 13 apps I can't live without Rianne Schestowitz 27/01/2015 - 8:55pm
Story GHOST, a critical Linux security hole, is revealed Rianne Schestowitz 27/01/2015 - 8:45pm
Story 4MLinux Allinone Edition 11.0 Is a Complete OS Roy Schestowitz 27/01/2015 - 8:32pm
Story White House CTO calls for open source APIs, visibility for women Rianne Schestowitz 27/01/2015 - 8:26pm
Story Plasma 5.2 Is Beautiful and Featureful Rianne Schestowitz 27/01/2015 - 7:55pm
Story Why screen lockers on X11 cannot be secure Roy Schestowitz 27/01/2015 - 7:54pm
Story Tiny $26 WiFi-ready IoT SBC runs OpenWRT Linux Rianne Schestowitz 27/01/2015 - 7:42pm

Smolt Desktop Profiler from Fedora

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duckzland.ismywebsite: This is exactly one feature that gentoo should integrate in its wiki page. Smolt will get your hardware profile, profile such as what is your audio card, video card and cpu hardware.

Opera Responds to Challenges from Open Source Browsers

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Software Opera has always had its own fiercely loyal set of fans, but there actually have been some recent benchmark face-offs including it, and it was starting to look like Opera is falling behind.

Open Source Advocates Alarmed By Mickos's Sun Exit

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Software The fiscal impact may come if customers conclude that his departure means there's been a significant dilution of the MySQL brain trust at Sun.

ext4: The Fourth Extended Filesystem

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Software The ext4 file system is to be the successor to the ext3 journaled file system. The ext4 file system is now, as of December 25, 2008, released as stable and can be used as the dominant file system without fear of data loss.

Mandriva Linux: What Windows should be

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blog.stablephp: For the last 15 or more years I have been waiting for Linux to be as user frienly as Windows. Now, I am finally satisfied.

PCLinuxOS-N1PTT-TR6 Finally Released

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PCLOS The Ripper Gang is pleased to announce the first public beta ISO release of what will ultimately become PCLinuxOS 2009. This beta iso features kernel, KDE 3.5.10, Open Office 3.0, and Firefox 3.0.5.

10 obscure Linux applications you need to try

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Software With thousands of Linux tools out there, it stands to reason that some of the very best ones might get lost in the crowd. Jack Wallen introduces some excellent apps that more admins should know about.

Fatal Windows 7 Flaw Will Bolster Linux Netbooks

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Microsoft I think Microsoft has done a reasonably good job developing Windows 7. Most early buzz about the operating system was positive. But when it comes to running Windows 7 on netbooks, Microsoft has made a fatal design decision that will open the door for more Linux netbooks.

You Get What You Pay For

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OSS "You get what you pay for" is a common FUDphrase used to discredit Linux and FOSS, because so much of it is available free of cost. Which scares the purveyors of overpriced crapware, who would rather walk barefoot through broken glass and burning dung than write software that customers actually feel happy paying for.

Embracing Change: The Linux Paradigm

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Linux It's time to embrace change in the IT world. Linux, for many, is ushering in a new age of reason. But why the sudden move this direction? Is it a trendy move or a paradigm shift?

KDE 4 is not user ready

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KDE It is often said that many open-source-software is not enterprise-ready. But in order to be enterprise-ready, software must first be user-ready. I want to give you a feeling what I mean.

Why Does Everyone Heart Boxee?

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Software The buzz has been building for Boxee lately. Mainstream news outlets like The New York Times, BusinessWeek and NPR are getting hip to the little open-source media center that could quite possibly change the way you experience TV.

Linux Around the World

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Linux One of the coolest things about the Internet for me personally is that it lets you travel the world, yet can always bring you home in an instant. This may sound corny, but it never fails to amaze me, especially when I am far from home, as I am now.

Tiny Silent Linux PC Gets Updated

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Hardware In 2007 we ran a story on the tiny linux PC The Linutop. Now the diminutive system has hit version 2.4 and with it an official launch in the UK. The pint-sized, open source Linux PC is designed to run silently and is highly energy efficient at just 8 watts.

Damn Small indeed

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tangledbits.blogspot: Over the last several weeks I have been cleaning out my computer room. While digging through paperwork I found a pen that someone had given to me. The pen contained a 64MB USB drive. I set the pen off to the side. "Great," I thought, "now I can try to put Linux on there."

Xfce creator talks Linux, Moblin, netbooks and open-source

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Interviews SlashGear caught up with Xfce creator Olivier Fourdan, whose desktop environment has not only been selected by Intel for Moblin but can be found on many existing Linux netbooks, and talked Intel, Moblin, the future for netbooks and what challenges he sees for open-source newcomer Android.

why a widget, brother?

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • Google Patches All Intel Chromebooks Against Spectre Variant 2 with Chrome OS 65
    Google released a new stable version of its Linux-based Chrome OS operating system for Chromebooks, build 65.0.3325.167 (Platform version: 10323.58.0/1) bringing the Meltdown and Spectre mitigations to more devices and a bunch of other improvements.
  • VIDEO: Cooking With Linux: Lots and Lots of Word Processors! The Tuesday Linux Journal Show
  • How to use netstat in GNU/Linux
  • Cutelyst 2 released with HTTP/2 support
    Cutelyst the Qt/C++ web framework just got a major release update, around one and half year ago Cutelyst v1 got the first release with a stable API/ABI, many improvements where made during this period but now it was time to clean up the mistakes and give room for new features.
  • Fedora 28 and GNOME 3.28: New Features for Eastern Europe
    This time this is not fake, edited, patched, nor a custom build from COPR but the real screenshots of the unmodified downstream Fedora 28 planned to be released on May 1 this year. Here is how the default calendar widget in GNOME Shell looks in Greek, Polish, and Ukrainian:
  • Stephen Smoogen: /usr/bin/whoami
  • Debian CEF packages
    I've created some Debian CEF packages—CEF isn't the easiest thing to package (and it takes an hour to build even on my 20-core server, since it needs to build basically all of Chromium), but it's fairly rewarding to see everything fall into place. It should benefit not only Nageru, but also OBS and potentially CasparCG if anyone wants to package that.
  • Reproducible builds folks: Reproducible Builds: Weekly report #151
  • Porting L4Re and Fiasco.OC to the Ben NanoNote (Part 1)
    For quite some time, I have been interested in alternative operating system technologies, particularly kernels beyond the likes of Linux. Things like the Hurd and technologies associated with it, such as Mach, seem like worthy initiatives, and contrary to largely ignorant and conveniently propagated myths, they are available and usable today for anyone bothered to take a look. Indeed, Mach has had quite an active life despite being denigrated for being an older-generation microkernel with questionable performance credentials. But one technological branch that has intrigued me for a while has been the L4 family of microkernels. Starting out with the motivation to improve microkernel performance, particularly with regard to interprocess communication, different “flavours” of L4 have seen widespread use and, like Mach, have been ported to different hardware architectures. One of these L4 implementations, Fiasco.OC, appeared particularly interesting in this latter regard, in addition to various other features it offers over earlier L4 implementations. Meanwhile, I have had some success with software and hardware experiments with the Ben NanoNote. As you may know or remember, the Ben NanoNote is a “palmtop” computer based on an existing design (apparently for a pocket dictionary product) that was intended to offer a portable computing experience supported entirely by Free Software, not needing any proprietary drivers or firmware whatsoever. Had the Free Software Foundation been certifying devices at the time of its introduction, I imagine that it would have received the “Respects Your Freedom” certification. So, it seems to me that it is a worthy candidate for a Free Software porting exercise.
  • Samsung Announces Galaxy Tab Active2, a Rugged Android Tablet for Mobile Workers
    Samsung announced today the Galaxy Tab Active2 rugged Android tablet designed for mobile workers conducting business outdoors in industrial locations, under harsh weather, and other difficult conditions.

Games Leftovers

  • Atari reboots Ataribox as Atari VCS, teases April pre-order date
    Legendary game company Atari set retro hearts aflutter last year when it launched an Indiegogo crowdfunding campaign for something called the Ataribox, a living room device running Linux and supposedly combining the features of a PC with a video game console -- complete with some Atari classic games. But the December 14 pre-order date Atari set was abruptly canceled after an unspecified technical issue, and it looked like the Ataribox would never reach any actual customers. This week, however, the company has emerged at the Game Developers Conference with some very similar hardware, albeit with a new name.
  • The Rocket League 'Spring Fever' event is live promising lots of flower power
    Ready to earn some more cosmetic items? The Spring Fever event in Rocket League [Steam] is now live and you can earn yourself some new items using Flowers you earn while playing like this:
  • Epic Games releases the assets from Paragon, for Unreal Engine developers
    In a move that's both surprising and rather welcome, Epic Games has decided to release the assets from their FPS MOBA Paragon for Unreal Engine developers, since they're shutting it down. This will include 20 AAA-quality characters, with their respective skins, animations, VFX and dialogue, along with over 1,500 environment components from Paragon. Here's where it's a bit insane, this all cost Epic Games around $12 million! It's pretty insane how much it costs to make AAA-like games now—eye watering.
  • Game engine Construct 3 adds a remote preview, new runtime is coming to improve game performance
    I'm a huge fan of drag and drop creation tools like Construct 3 [Official Site], that allow you to create games by building simple events sheets and it seems they've continued making Construct 3 more awesome to use.
  • Open-source re-implementation of RollerCoaster Tycoon 2 'OpenRCT2' has a fresh update
    Miss the days of playing RollerCoaster Tycoon 2? Miss them no more, as OpenRCT2 [GitHub, Official Site] is alive and well with a fresh update. Like many open source game engines, it allows you to play RollerCoaster Tycoon 2 on systems not designed for it—like Linux. Naturally, it comes with tons of improvements like user interface theming, fast-forwarding gameplay, multiplayer and so on.
  • Zombasite - Orc Schism, the expansion to the action RPG is out adding more content
    Here's one I sadly missed, released back in December (oh my!), Zombasite - Orc Schism [Steam, GOG] is an expansion to the dynamic zombie apocalypse action RPG.

GNOME: GitLab Migration and More

  • IMPORTANT: GitLab mass migration plan
    I know some fellows doesn’t read desktop-devel-list, so let me share here an email that it’s important for all to read: We have put in place the plan for the mass migration to GitLab and the steps maintainers needs to do.
  • ED Update – week 11
  • Reflections on Distractions in Work, Productivity and Time Usage
    For the past year or so I have mostly worked at home or remote in my daily life. Currently I’m engaged in my master thesis and need to manage my daily time and energy to work on it. It is no surprise to many of us that working using your internet-connected personal computer at home can make you prone to many distractions. However, managing your own time is not just about whipping and self-discipline. It is about setting yourself up in a structure which rewards you for hard work and gives your mind the breaks it needs. Based on reflections and experimentation with many scheduling systems and tools I finally felt I have achieved a set of principles I really like and that’s what I’ll be sharing with you today. [...] Minimizing shell notifications: While I don’t have the same big hammer to “block access to my e-mail” here, I decided to change the order of my e-mail inboxes in Geary so my more relevant (and far less activity prone) student e-mail inbox appears first. I also turned off the background e-mail daemon and turned off notification banners in GNOME Shell. [...] Lastly, I want to give two additional tips. If you like listening to music while working, consider whether it might affect your productivity. For example, I found music with vocals to be distracting me if I try to immerse myself in reading difficult litterature. I can really recommend Doctor Turtle’s acoustic instrumental music while working though (all free). Secondly, I find that different types of tasks requires different postures. For abstract, high-level or vaguely formulated tasks (fx formulating goals, reviewing something or reflecting), I find interacting with the computer whilst standing up and walking around to really help gather my thoughts. On the other hand with practical tasks or tasks which require immersion (fx programming tasks), I find sitting down to be much more comfortable.

OSS, Openwashing and FUD