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Wednesday, 21 Mar 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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KDE4 apps: digiKam

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Software DigiKam is an application to manage your digital photos professionally, with a claim of: “Manage your photographs like a professional, with the power of Open Source”.

Using Your Linux Computer As A Media Center

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Software If you are a Windows or Mac user, you will be familiar with Windows Media Center or Front Row that both have the ability to turn your computer into a Media Center PC. Linux users don’t have such luck as most distros do not come with a media center application pre-installed.

Sharpen Your Mind and Have Fun With Tux

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Software It is time to take a break from Linux commands and have some fun playing computer games. Luckily, the open source software community offers many gaming and educational choices among the other applications.

Update Twitter and FriendFeed from the Linux command line

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Here's a nice Linux command line Twitter and FriendFeed tip.

Faces behind Popular Linux Distros

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Linux Have you ever wondered who are the people behind Ubuntu, Debian, Slackware,..? Stop wondering and have a look at faces behind popular Linux Distros.

Why I don’t like Canonical

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Mandriva's Adam W: Canonical is a privately-held company. It has no external shareholders and is not listed on any stock exchange. This means it has no legal obligation to provide any information to the public about its assets, liabilities, revenues, costs, or anything at all along those lines.

The Windows 7 GUI from a Linux user's perspective

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Microsoft Today, hard core Linux users were able to view for the first time some of nifty GUI features in Microsoft's next generation desktop operation system - Windows 7. The only significant feature Linux doesn't already include natively in its many free versions is multi-touch.

some howtos:

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  • How to listen to your XM Radio on OpenSUSE 11, the "easy" way

  • Share Ubuntu folders with Windows (samba)
  • Manipulating CD/DVD images with AcetoneISO2
  • Bash: Piping to a Shell Script
  • Use DropBox to seamlessly sync files
  • Ubuntu: Change Sensitivity of the Synaptics Touchpad
  • Setup a Rsync server on Gentoo
  • Audacity Tutorial part 2 – applying effects
  • 50+ Resources For Your Linux Setup/Desktop/Machine/Brain

Michael Robertson Sues Me to Impede My Freedom of Speech

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kevincarmony.blogspot: As many of you know, I have used my blog as a resource to bring to light the questionable actions of Michael Robertson, and to go public with his treatment of employees and shareholders. Today I was served with a lawsuit by Michael Robertson in an effort to obscure my blog and impede my freedom of speech.

Extenders: now 400% more pretty

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pindablog.wordpress: You might have seen the screencast about extenders in the commit-digest of a couple of weeks ago. While not much features have been added since, I have applied quite some polish. Not only in the form of bugfixes, but also in the form of a fresh new look, designed by Pinheiro.

Windows 7: A First Look

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  • Windows 7: A First Look

  • First look at Windows 7's User Interface
  • Windows 7: Official screenshots
  • First look: Windows 7 takes on Apple
  • Windows 7 Screenshots

Is open source old news?

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  • Is open source old news?

  • Help me! I use Open Source
  • Hard questions at the heart of open source security

The 10 lamest Firefox add-ons

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  • The 10 lamest Firefox add-ons

  • FireFox 3 Add-ons Recommendation List
  • Firefox Add-ons - Manage browser add-ons in centralized manner

Linux-Based Instant-On Trend Spreads Out

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  • Linux-Based Instant-On Trend Spreads Out

  • The Race to Instant-On Computers Begins
  • Could Linux be the key to instant-on for Windows laptops?

How to sell Linux netbooks to the world

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Hardware 2008 has been the year of the netbook. Since the surprise runaway success of the ASUS Eee Linux PC in 2007 there has been a surge of hardware vendors joining in. Yet MSI users have poo-pooed the use of Linux on these systems. I disagree. Here's why Linux netbooks are the future.

10 Essential Applications in Ubuntu 8.10 & others

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  • 10 Essential Applications Included in Ubuntu 8.10 Intrepid Ibex

  • Quick hint: Ubuntu 8.10 might already be here
  • 15 Beautiful Ubuntu Wallpapers for a Sleeker Intrepid Ibex
  • Ubuntu 8.10 better than Fedora 10?
  • Searching for package information on Debian and Ubuntu systems
  • Close but no cigar for me and Ubuntu on my Eee PC
  • Canonical's Next (And Hardest) Steps

It's Time for a FOSS Community Code of Conduct

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OSS Personal abuse, quotes taken out of context, misrepresentations, outright lies -- if you have any visibility in the free and open source software (FOSS) community, the chances are that you regularly face all these kinds of attacks. I suggest that community members voluntarily subscribe to a code of conduct to create a frame of reference in which the abuse can be countered and judged.

How Different Are Linux Distributions from One Another?

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computingtech.blogspot: While different Linux systems will add different logos, choose some different software components to include, and have different ways of installing and configuring Linux, most people who become used to Linux can move pretty easily from one Linux to another. There are a few reasons for this:

The netbook newbie's guide to Linux

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Linux Episode Two This is a series about the Linux OS on netbooks, but we need to remind ourselves that these devices aren't personal computers. Netbooks are essentially machines you work through, out into the Cloud.

The LXF Analysis: Open source innovations

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OSS Open source/Free Software often gets a bad rap for innovation. It just copies commercial software, right? Not so, as Neil Bothwick explains -- from eye candy to the internet, FOSS has pioneered new technologies and ways of working...

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Games Chronicon, BROKE PROTOCOL, Internet Archive

  • 2D action RPG 'Chronicon' to arrive on Linux with the next big update
    The colourful action RPG Chronicon [Steam, Official Site] should arrive on Linux with the next big update, the developer has said.
  • BROKE PROTOCOL is like a low-poly GTA Online and it's coming to Linux
    BROKE PROTOCOL [Steam], a low-poly open-world action game that's a little like GTA Online and it's coming to Linux.
  • The Internet Archive Just Uploaded a Bunch of Playable, Classic Handheld Games
    The non-profit Internet Archive is perhaps best known for its Wayback Machine that takes snap shots of web sites so you can see what they looked like in the past. However, it also has a robust side project where it emulates and uploads old, outdated games that aren’t being maintained anymore. Recently, the organization added a slew of a unique kind of game that’s passed into memory: handheld LCD electronic games. The games–like Mortal Kombat, depicted above–used special LCD screens with preset patterns. They could only display the exact images in the exact place that they were specified for. This meant the graphics were incredibly limited and each unit could only play the one game it was designed to play. A Game Boy, this was not.
  • Internet Archive emulator brings dozens of handheld games back from obscurity
    Over the weekend, the Internet Archive announced it was offering a new series of emulators. This time, they’re designed to mimic one of gaming’s most obscure artifacts — handheld games. When I say a “handheld game,” I don’t mean the Game Boy or the PSP — those are handheld consoles. These are single-game handheld or tabletop devices that look and feel more like toys. The collection includes the very old, mostly-forgotten games sold in mini-handhelds from the 80s onward.

Linux Foundation Videos and Projects

LibrePlanet free software conference celebrates 10th anniversary, this weekend at MIT, March 24-25

This weekend, the Free Software Foundation (FSF) and the Student Information Processing Board (SIPB) at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) present the tenth annual LibrePlanet free software conference in Cambridge, March 24-25, 2018, at MIT. LibrePlanet is an annual conference for people who care about their digital freedoms, bringing together software developers, policy experts, activists, and computer users to learn skills, share accomplishments, and tackle challenges facing the free software movement. LibrePlanet 2018 will feature sessions for all ages and experience levels. LibrePlanet's tenth anniversary theme is "Freedom Embedded." Embedded systems are everywhere, in cars, digital watches, traffic lights, and even within our bodies. We've come to expect that proprietary software's sinister aspects are embedded in software, digital devices, and our lives, too: we expect that our phones monitor our activity and share that data with big companies, that governments enforce digital restrictions management (DRM), and that even our activity on social Web sites is out of our control. This year's talks and workshops will explore how to defend user freedom in a society reliant on embedded systems. Read more Also: FSF Blogs: Friday Free Software Directory IRC meetup time: March 23rd starting at 12:00 p.m. EDT/16:00 UTC