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Thursday, 14 Dec 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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A Reader’s Guide to the Red Hat/Firestar Settlement

Filed under
Linux
Legal

redhat.com: Last month, we announced that Red Hat had settled a patent infringement case with an agreement that was significant in fashioning a new model for protection for the open source community. We demonstrated that it is possible to satisfy the letter and spirit of GPL licensing in resolving patent litigation.

Linux guru? then switch to Arch Linux!

Filed under
Linux

antonywilliams.com: It's official, I've ditched Debian (and Ubuntu) completely. All my computers are now running Arch Linux. Why did I switch? It's more stable, faster, updated more frequently and more customisable. Let me explain some of the main differences.

Too many Linux distributions?

Filed under
Linux

celettu.wordpress: That’s one you often hear, right? There are too many Linux distributions, and that’s a problem. To some people, who then feel compelled to blog about it. Most of the times, the reasons stated are confusion for new Linux users, and lack of a unified install method for all Linuxes.

Benchmarking hardware RAID vs. Linux kernel software RAID

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: Want to get an idea of what speed advantage adding an expensive hardware RAID card to your new server is likely to give you? You can benchmark the performance difference between running a RAID using the Linux kernel software RAID and a hardware RAID card. My own tests of the two alternatives yielded some interesting results.

The Value of Free

Filed under
OSS

goodcomputing.blogspot: How do you put a value on the products created through open source? Do you consider all the time spent crafting quality software? Take into account your own effort in advocating its use? Charge for packaging and a profit margin? How, exactly, would Best Buy have come to the conclusion that Ubuntu Linux is worth $19.99? I think the answer is fairly simple: they guessed.

Dang, Darn, Damn Small Linux!

Filed under
Linux

zdnet.co.uk/blog: I've been looking at a very interesting variant of Linux called Damn Small Linux. Its 3 major contributors have basically taken a minimalist approach to Linux and have created a system that can provide a basic desktop running on an OS that's right around 50 Megabytes.

First few days with Mandriva 2009.0

Filed under
MDV

ruminationsonthedigitalrealm.org: With the first few days (and couple of hundred updates) under the belt I can say a little bit more about my first impressions with the Alpha 2 release of Mandriva 2009. I started last Sunday and have been using it pretty much as the default since.

Virtual Hosting With Proftpd And MySQL (Incl. Quota) On Fedora 9

Filed under
HowTos

This document describes how to install a Proftpd server that uses virtual users from a MySQL database instead of real system users. This is much more performant and allows to have thousands of ftp users on a single machine. In addition to that I will show the use of quota with this setup.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • In Memory of Uwe Thiem

  • My Perfect Desktop: Kubuntu KDE 4
  • My kid hates Linux
  • The new and improved Ubuntu QA
  • Problems with encrypted networks in Fedora
  • If you use Linux, you MUST try gLabels
  • 2.6.26 at last
  • Brasero 0.8.0 gets cover editor, new plugin and much more
  • Edimax EW-7728In 802.11n (RaLink rt2860) with Linux 2.6.26

  • Tweaking the Eee PC part 3
  • Backup GMAIL with FetchMail
  • Use Vim As A Syntax Highlighting Pager
  • Using SFDISK to backup your partition table
  • Doom3 and Wolfenstein: Enemy Territory Fix
  • Screencasting from Linux/Ubuntu
  • Converting Binary Numbers To Decimal The Hard Way On Linux Or Unix

Amarok 2 alpha 1 looking strong

Filed under
Software

arstechnica.com: The first alpha release of Amarok 2 was made available for download last week. The popular open-source music player is undergoing a significant transformation and receiving a highly anticipated update for KDE 4.

Malware on GNU/Linux

Filed under
Security

[M]alware includes not just virii, but worms, trojans and root-kits. These known and widely available tools are not the only options available to intruders either. GNU/Linux users should not have any false sense of security just based on the fact that viruses designed for exclusively for windows won't run on GNU/Linux.

Flaws found in BSD, Linux software updaters

Filed under
Linux

zdnet.com.au: The software update mechanisms used by most BSD and Linux operating systems can be tricked into installing buggy or known-to-be-compromised software on users' systems, creating serious security risks, according to new research.

An introduction to Wubi

Filed under
Software

technologytales.com: The Toshiba laptop that I acquired at the start of the year is a Windows Vista box and it isn’t something with which I want to play too roughly because the OS came pre-installed on it. I still want to continue to see how Vista goes at close quarters so removing it to put Ubuntu or some other Linux distribution on there wasn’t ever going to be an option.

Enterprises still not getting full benefits of open source

Filed under
OSS

blogs.zdnet.com: We have been discussing this for weeks here, but now there’s confirmation from Forrester Research. Enterprises are not getting the full benefits of open source. The real problem, it seems to me, is they don’t understand the nature of open source.

Shuttleworth: "Apple is driving the innovation"

Filed under
Interviews
Ubuntu

derstandard.at: At the recent GNOME Users and Developers Conference (GUADEC) in Istanbul Andreas Proschofsky had the chance to sit down with Ubuntu-founder Mark Shuttleworth to talk about the new release, but also about the Linux desktop as a whole, the strengths of Apple and possible major changes to the GNOME platform.

Looking For Software? Gnomefiles May Help!

Filed under
Web

workswithu.com: One of the classic problems that newcomers to Linux face is locating and installing software to do the work they want to accomplish. The more than 20,000 packages that Ubuntu offers up can be daunting indeed. This is where sites like Gnomefiles.com can come in. Gnomefiles is a clearing house of software built on GTK, the application toolkit that underpins the Gnome desktop that Ubuntu uses.

Web apps: the next battleground for FOSS?

Filed under
OSS

linux.com: Concerned about the increasing popularity of Web applications, Marco Barulli of the Clipperz project has written one of the first detailed suggestions about how free and open source software (FOSS) should respond to the trend. Although neither Barulli nor Clipperz is well-known, his ideas are being listened to by such figures as Richard M. Stallman and Fabrizio Capobianco.

BeOS-like distro focused on content creation

Filed under
Linux

desktoplinux.com: A new Ubuntu-based Linux distribution has arrived, aimed at both Linux newbies and content creators. Boasting "out of the box" multimedia codecs, the freely downloadable PC/OS incorporates the lightweight XFCE desktop, and is said to offer a similar layout to the groundbreaking, but ultimately doomed BeOS.

Open source quality checker released

Filed under
Software

theregister.co.uk: An open source software project, originally propped up by European Commission (EC) funds, has released an alpha version of its quality control program, Alitheia Core.

Blender 3D: Interview with Allan Brito

Filed under
Software
Interviews

packtpub.com: Blender is the open source, cross platform suite of tools for 3D creation, capable of modeling, rendering, and animating 3D environments. Packt spokesperson Meeba Abraham approached Allan Brito at the heart of this movement to understand his take on the future of Blender.

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More in Tux Machines

An introduction to Joplin, an open source Evernote alternative

Joplin is an open source cross-platform note-taking and to-do application. It can handle a large number of notes, organized into notebooks, and can synchronize them across multiple devices. The notes can be edited in Markdown, either from within the app or with your own text editor, and each application has an option to render Markdown with formatting, images, URLs, and more. Any number of files, such as images and PDFs, can be attached to a note, and notes can also be tagged. I started developing Joplin when Evernote changed its pricing model and because I wanted my 4,000+ notes to be stored in a more open format, free of any proprietary solution. To that end, I have developed three Joplin applications, all under the MIT License: for desktop (Windows, MacOS, and Linux), for mobile (Android and iOS), and for the terminal (Windows, MacOS, and Linux). All the applications have similar user interfaces and can synchronize with each other. They are based on open standards and technologies including SQLite and JavaScript for the backend, and Terminal Kit (Node.js), Electron, and React Native for the three front ends. Read more

Open Source OS Still supporting 32-bit Architecture and Why it’s Important

One after the other, Linux distributions are dropping 32-bit support. Or, to be accurate, they drop support for the Intel x86 32-bit architecture (IA-32). Indeed, computers based on x86_64 hardware (IA-64) are superior in every way to their 32-bits counterpart: they are more powerful, run faster, are more compact, and more energy efficient. Not mentioning their price has considerably decreased in just a few years. If you have the opportunity to switch to 64 bits, do it. But, to quote a mail I received recently from Peter Tribble, author of Tribblix: “[… ] in the developed world we assume that we can replace things; in some parts of the developing world older IA-32 systems are still the norm, with 64-bit being rare.” Read more

KDE Applications 17.12 Lands with Dolphin Enhancements, HiDPI Support for Okular

KDE Applications 17.12 has been in development for the past several months and it's now available as a drop-in replacement for the previous series of the software suite, KDE Applications 17.08, which reached end of life in early November. As expected, several of the included apps received various enhancements and new features in this release. Among these, we can mention that the Dolphin file manager is now capable of saving searches, can limit the search only to folders, makes renaming of files easier by allowing the user to simply double-click on the file name, displays extra information about files like origin URL of downloaded file or modification date, and introduces new Bitrate, Genre, and Release Year columns. Read more Also: KDE Applications 17.12 Brings HiDPI Improvements, Rest Of KDE Games Ported To KF5 KDE Ships KDE Applications 17.12.0

Stable kernels 4.14.6 and 4.9.69

Two new stable kernels have been released by Greg Kroah-Hartman: 4.14.6 and 4.9.69. As usual, they contain fixes all over the kernel tree; users of those series should upgrade. Read more See: Linux 4.14.6 and Linux 4.9.69