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About Tux Machines

Saturday, 17 Mar 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Release of KDE Frameworks 5.5.0 Roy Schestowitz 12/12/2014 - 8:08pm
Story diff -u: What's New in Kernel Development Roy Schestowitz 12/12/2014 - 7:45pm
Story Must-have Linux desktop apps (Six Clicks) Roy Schestowitz 12/12/2014 - 7:35pm
Story Has The Russian Government Moved To GNU/Linux As Planned? Roy Schestowitz 12/12/2014 - 7:29pm
Story IT should listen to users not just managers, says SugarCRM CEO Roy Schestowitz 12/12/2014 - 7:02pm
Story European Commission updates its open source policy Roy Schestowitz 12/12/2014 - 9:39am
Story HP's Big Slap-In-The-Face To Microsoft Will Show Up Next Year Roy Schestowitz 12/12/2014 - 9:36am
Story The Best Terminal Emulators for Linux Roy Schestowitz 12/12/2014 - 9:23am
Story Red Hat 7.1 Beta, Malware History, and Bug Reports Roy Schestowitz 12/12/2014 - 9:20am
Story 4MLinux Is So Lightweight It's Anemic Roy Schestowitz 12/12/2014 - 9:10am

Why do we Release openSUSE on Thursdays - or why do we Slip?

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Andreas Jaeger: openSUSE 11.1 Beta3 is a bit later than expected (it should go out later today). Of course, this raised couple of questions why. So let me explain how a build of a Beta release works in general from release manager perspective and what are the reasons for the slip.

Hey, Dad…Can I have Linux back?

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education.zdnet: My oldest son, creator of flame wars, finally discovered that you can only surf to the nether regions of the Internet so many times before even Vista business succumbs to malware. His computer an unusable mass of pop-ups, spewing traffic over our network actually asked me tonight to reinstall Linux for him.

today's leftovers

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  • PCLinuxOS Magazine October 2008 Released

  • Mac OS is better than Ubuntu Linux: A myth
  • Tracking down license infringements with the GPL Compliance Engineering Guide
  • Let's Dance: Learning The Samba
  • Fooling windows by dancing the samba with Linux
  • ScreenCast: Fedora Talk with Twinkle
  • Foresight 2.0.5 review - First Impressions
  • A Week Of Open Source Riches
  • Novell Open Enterprise beta targets Netware users
  • Mozilla Developer News 10/21
  • Symbian seeks to attract developers with open-source code
  • Android is now Open Source
  • Encrypt CD/DVDs
  • Apricot netbook ditches Linux
  • Gentoo-Wiki, Gentoo-portage Down
  • Linux Carried Along on Netbooks Wave
  • Is commercial open source possible?
  • Improve MySQL performance with MySQLTuner
  • Sending Email From Your System with sSMTP
  • BBC Weather
  • Indamixx sound box plays on Linux base
  • Red Hat promises open-source virtualization technology
  • Change (gk)sudo timeout
  • Examining the compilation process. part 2.
  • Interview With David Ascher And Dan Mosedale - Thunderbird - Mozilla Messaging

Plat'Home Unveils Final Results of "Will Linux Work?"

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PR: Plat'Home today announced the results of the "Will Linux Work?" contest. For the past month, Plat'Home's OpenMicroServer (OMS) has been in the hands of the four contest winners who have put Linux to the test.

Release your creative side with Ubuntu Studio

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Ubuntu Often when we talk about Linux it is often in the context of a computer enthusiast, a person who enjoys finding out what open source technology can do for them. A group that sometimes we don't think about is our creative friends, artists, musicians, animators, audio engineers, video editors and suchlike.

The Goal of Funtoo

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Gentoo A lot of people have asked me recently “What is the goal of Funtoo? What are you trying to do?” Here’s an explanation of what Funtoo is about.

Kernel Log: More than 10 million lines of Linux source files

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Linux After the release of Linux 2.6.27, kernel developers are currently busily integrating patches for the next kernel version into the main development branch of Linux. This usually involves discarding some old code and adding new code thouhg on balance, there are usually more new lines than old ones, making the kernel grow continually.

Who Are The Real Friends of Linux and Free Software?

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Linux Ken Starks is one of my favorite people. He is the prime mover behind Komputers 4 Kids, Tux500, and Lindependence 2008. He makes his living selling and supporting Linux systems to businesses and home users. You won't find Ken wasting his days infesting online forums and chats with windy opinionating and beating up noobs-- Ken is a man of action with a direct approach to solving problems.

plasma is now feature complete?

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aseigo.blogspot: The following covers features and material that will be available in 4.2, which will not be released until January 2009.

some shorts

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  • YaST Mascot Contest

  • Obama Ubuntu
  • Richard Stallman at U of M Tonight
  • All the Linux Mint flavors now on nicely printed CDs

Minisys Linux: Puppy on steroids

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Linux Puppy Linux makes it easy to remaster its distribution, which probably explains the sheer number of Puppy Linux variants, called puplets, in the wild. Minisys Linux, or Muppy, is an interesting puplet in the form of a modular Linux distro based on a Puppy Linux and Slackware 12 mix.

Microsoft’s new “Global Anti-Piracy Day” must have Linux users laughing

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  • Microsoft’s new “Global Anti-Piracy Day” must have Linux users laughing

  • Pirates scoff at Microsoft's anti-piracy day
  • Microsoft’s “Don’t Talk Like a Pirate” day

Idiot of the Year! Ignorant Linux Writer…

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molom.wordpress: I can’t stand hearing ignorant idiotic individuals when they start posting utter rubbish on forums, but when they post their own opinion on an article, it makes me laugh for quite a while because it really reveals how much of an idiot this individual may be.

Bridging the Linux chasm

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linuxgeeksunited.blogspot: Most people will agree on what a commercial distro is. it is fairly obvious. A distro that is funded and backed by a company. Then there is the wild west world of "Community" distros.

10 Fun Firefox Add-ons

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Moz/FF We all know that Firefox has hundreds of great add-ons to enhance our web browsing experience. Since there are already plenty of lists out there that features some of the most essential add-ons, I'm left with sharing to you all this collection of fun Firefox add-ons.

Desktop Unix: MacOS X and SUSE Linux

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OS All three of the main OS candidates: MacOS X, Novell’s “Sousa Linicks” and Microsoft’s Windows Vista run on pretty much the same hardware and run broadly comparable applications suites, so the decision must ultimately come down to which one best balances cost versus productivity in your applications area.

GIMP 2.6 changes are mostly internal

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GIMP The GIMP -- the GNU Image Manipulation Program -- is one of the flagships of free software. On October 1 the project released version 2.6, with many new and improved features. Most of the user-visible features are just polish; the real changes are lurking under the hood.

Flash 10 on Linux: Better, not great, better

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blogs.computerworld: Adobe Flash is still a proprietary program and I, and a lot of other open-source people, wish that it wasn't. That said, the latest Flash Player 10 on Linux is a lot faster than the last version and it opens up the doors to a lot of Web-based video content.

Firestarter - A modern Linux Firewall

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Software Irrespective of the operating system, intrusion is one of the key concerns for computers connected to a network. Firewalls, as a matter of fact provide a resistance to this, if not a fool proof protection.

Four password lockers that can help you keep your Web logins secure

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Software It is good practice to use a different password for each Web site you need to log in to. Good passwords tend to be long and contain a wide selection of characters. That can make remembering all your passwords difficult. But you can make things easier on yourself by storing passwords for various Web sites in an encrypted file on your computer.

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More in Tux Machines

lkml: remove eight obsolete architectures

In the end, it seems that while the eight architectures are extremely different, they all suffered the same fate: There was one company in charge of an SoC line, a CPU microarchitecture and a software ecosystem, which was more costly than licensing newer off-the-shelf CPU cores from a third party (typically ARM, MIPS, or RISC-V). It seems that all the SoC product lines are still around, but have not used the custom CPU architectures for several years at this point. Read more

If you hitch a ride with a scorpion… (Coverity)

I haven’t seen a blog post or notice about this, but according to the Twitters, Coverity has stopped supporting online scanning for open source projects. Is anybody shocked by this? Anybody? [...] Not sure what the story is with Coverity, but it probably has something to do with 1) they haven’t been able to monetize the service the way they hoped, or 2) they’ve been able to monetize the service and don’t fancy spending the money anymore or 3) they’ve pivoted entirely and just aren’t doing the scanning thing. Not sure which, don’t really care — the end result is the same. Open source projects that have come to depend on this now have to scramble to replace the service. [...] I’m not going to go all RMS, but the only way to prevent this is to have open tools and services. And pay for them. Read more

Easily Fund Open Source Projects With These Platforms

Financial support is one of the many ways to help Linux and Open Source community. This is why you see “Donate” option on the websites of most open source projects. While the big corporations have the necessary funding and resources, most open source projects are developed by individuals in their spare time. However, it does require one’s efforts, time and probably includes some overhead costs too. Monetary supports surely help drive the project development. If you would like to support open source projects financially, let me show you some platforms dedicated to open source and/or Linux. Read more

KDE: Kdenlive, Kubuntu, Elisa, KDE Connect

  • Kdenlive Café #27 and #28 – You can’t miss it
    Timeline refactoring, new Pro features, packages for fast and easy install, Windows version and a bunch of other activities are happening in the Kdenlive world NOW!
  • Kubuntu 17.10 Guide for Newbie Part 9
    This is the 9th article, the final part of the series. This ninth article gives you more documentations to help yourself in using Kubuntu 17.10. The resources are online links to certain manuals and ebooks specialized for Kubuntu basics, command lines usage, software installation instructions, how to operate LibreOffice and KDE Plasma.
  • KDE's Elisa Music Player Preparing For Its v0.1 Released
    We have been tracking the development of Elisa, one of several KDE music players, since development started about one year ago. Following the recent alpha releases, the KDE Elisa 0.1 stable release is on the way. Elisa developers are preparing the Elisa v0.1 release and they plan to have it out around the middle of April.
  • KDE Connect Keeps Getting Better For Interacting With Your Desktop From Android
    KDE Connect is the exciting project that allows you to leverage your KDE desktop from Android tablets/smartphones for features like sending/receiving SMS messages from your desktop, toggling music, sharing files, and much more. KDE Connect does continue getting even better.
  • First blog & KDE Connect media control improvements
    I've started working on KDE Connect last November. My first big features were released yesterday in KDE Connect 1.8 for Android, so cause for celebration and a blog post! My first big feature is media notifications. KDE Connect has, since it's inception, allowed you to remotely control your music and video's. Now you can also do this with a notification, like all Android music apps do! So next time a bad song comes up, you don't need to switch to the KDE Connect app. Just click next on the notification without closing you current app. And just in case you don't like notifications popping up, there's an option to disable it.