Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Saturday, 26 May 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story ​Red Hat buys into Docker containers with Atomic Host Rianne Schestowitz 06/03/2015 - 1:42am
Story VMware heads to court over GPL violations Rianne Schestowitz 05/03/2015 - 10:44pm
Story 5 awesome security features to expect in PC-BSD 10.1.2 Rianne Schestowitz 05/03/2015 - 8:30am
Story COM Express module runs Linux on a 2.3GHz Tegra K1 Rianne Schestowitz 05/03/2015 - 8:25am
Story From the Editors: You’ve come a long way, Linux Rianne Schestowitz 05/03/2015 - 8:21am
Story SteamOS A Linux Distribution For Gaming Mohd Sohail 05/03/2015 - 4:22am
Story KDE Applications 14.12.3 Officially Released Rianne Schestowitz 1 04/03/2015 - 11:30pm
Story Understanding The Linux Kernel's BPF In-Kernel Virtual Machine Rianne Schestowitz 04/03/2015 - 8:58pm
Story Calligra 2.9.0 is Out Rianne Schestowitz 04/03/2015 - 8:38pm
Story Latest Nvidia Shield player runs Android TV on Tegra X1 Rianne Schestowitz 04/03/2015 - 8:30pm

Why Live USB/CDs are awesome

Filed under
Ubuntu

newlinuxuser.com: If you’re looking around for a good distro to use for your computer, it will probably take you several installs and months of usage (maybe even years!) to decide if you’d stick with what you have or switch to another.

Even hackers get the blues

Filed under
Web

blogs.zdnet.com: The bonds of the FOSS community go far beyond software. Case in point, Arjen Lentz is stepping outside the bounds of the comfortable realm of software and launching bluehackers.org.

What is so bad about the command line?

Filed under
Linux

toolbox.com/blogs: All the Linux bashers use this as an excuse/reason why Linux is not suitable as a desktop operating system. You should never have to use the command line they say. I personally don't think the command line is bad at all.

Will the economic downturn mean a free software upturn?

Filed under
Linux

So here we are, entering another year — and no doubt at some point during this year, more than one person will declare it the “year of the Linux desktop”. Of course it won’t happen and those who consider themselves free software opponents will soon let us know.

Linux Distro Review - #! CrunchBang 8.10

Filed under
Linux

linux-hardcore.com: I am going to review one of those distributions that have as a mission to be minimalist and without frills, but just trying to be effective. It's called CrunchBang and I was very surprised, we see why.

Virtual Machines, Put To The Developer Test

Filed under
OS

ddj.com: Often, a developer's goal is to create software that runs on many different operating systems, while giving users the same experience no matter which operating system they happen to be using. Virtual machine technology lets developers run multiple operating systems each installed in a VM, which should save them time and money -- if the VM performance doesn't suffer.

Songbird 1.0 Review - An Awesome Release!

Filed under
Software

tuxarena.blogspot: Not long ago I reviewed Songbird 0.7.0, and in the meantime version 1.0.0 was released. What are the new features Songbird comes with and what improvements over the previous releases features 1.0?

Is it the End of the Road for Live CDs?

freesoftwaremagazine.com: I was window shopping in a high street electronics store a few days ago. I was delighted to see a shelf display full of netbooks from vendors like Samsung, Acer, Dell, Advent and Asus (of course), to name a few. It looked like the Asus EeePC had launched an idea whose time had come and in the process possibly heralded the long withdrawing roar of the live CD.

MS Office vs OpenOffice

Filed under
OOo

blog.lib.umn.edu: MS Office is a pain. It's not the worst word processor in the world, but I find that Word actually makes it more difficult for me to create and edit my documents. It's much easier to do the same work under OpenOffice.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • How I went from a stable Gentoo install to a Full Funtoo System

  • CAOS Theory Podcast 2009.01.23
  • Linux Outlaws 73 - If It Works, Don't Touch It! (Mythbuntu Review)
  • Process Substitution
  • mv linux.conf.au linux.conf.nz?
  • Windows 7 Buzz Could Hold Off Mac and Linux
  • A Unix/Linux "Where's Waldo?" Or "Who Wants Some PI?"
  • New FSF microblogging communities
  • An Explanation of .bashrc and .bash_profile
  • 10 Ways to Make Your Open Source Database Project Float
  • My 5 Favorite Free Linux Games
  • Remote Desktop Between Ubuntu/Linux and Windows, Part I
  • Big Ubuntu Jaunty promises
  • How to remove “Online Help” and “openSUSE” icon on OpenSUSE 11.1
  • Pleasant Linux Surprises
  • Commercial game looking for a Linux maintainer

Ubuntu Christian Edition: Truth Remains Stranger Than Fiction

Filed under
Ubuntu

linuxshellaccount.blogspot: If you haven't had a chance yet, and you're the type who likes to mix your religion in with your work (oh yeah, and you're Christian), this Unique Ubuntu Distribution may be for you!

Microsoft Deserves Some Credit for Reaching Out to Moonlight

Filed under
Microsoft
Software

linuxloop.com: Whatever you might want to say about Microsoft calling Silverlight “crossplatform” and not making a version for Linux, you have to give them credit for what they did leading up to Obama’s inauguraiton.

Not Linux' Quietest Couple of Weeks

Filed under
Linux

ldn.linuxfoundation.org: Well, I'd have to say that for January, these past few days have certainly been chock full o' Linux news. And not just any news: a big Linux conference, a significant licensing shift for a big-name Linux library, layoffs in Redmond, and--perhaps most earth-shattering of all--Bdale Garbee got his beard shaved off for charity.

Introducing KDE 4 - Kontact: Kmail

Filed under
KDE

introducingkde4.blogspot: I can't truly comment on how much it improve, since I didn't use Kontact in KDE 3.5.x, however, what I can say is I'm completely amazed by it. It works well, it has a overall good interface (with some, from my point of view, little mistakes here and there).

Editor's Note: Joe Sixpack Must Die

Filed under
Linux

linuxtoday.com: Linux advocacy is caught up in a race to the bottom, and this is understandable, because for those who wish to dethrone Windows, diving to the bottom appears to be the most direct route to the throne. But appearances are deceiving.

Linux pitfall of soft links ln - Rhythm Box - Music Player on Ubuntu

Filed under
Software

watkissonline.co.uk: I came across a strange issue on one of my Ubuntu computers. I had added some more MP3 files to my music folder and so to my surprise I ended up with two of each file in my library on Rhythm Box.

Jolicloud OS for netbooks grows up, gets its own interface

Filed under
Linux

liliputing.com: Jolicloud is an operating system that’s being designed specifically for netbooks. It’s based on Ubuntu Linux, but it’s really designed to provide quick and easy access to internet based applications like Facebook, Gmail, Skype, and Twitter.

3 Hacks for Firefox That Will Double Your Internet Browsing Speed

Filed under
Moz/FF

gnoted.com: There are many people out there complaining about the Firefox RAM Memory Bug. Now a lot of us have found the ’secrets’ on how to manipulate settings in “about:config” to drop the memory usage as long as possible and to increase the speed at which Firefox loads sites.

Combo media box runs Linux

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

linuxdevices.com: Blusens Technologies has announced a combination set-top box, digital video recorder, network-attached storage device, and media server that runs Linux on a Sigma SMP8634 SoC.

Tabbed Browsing for Packages

Filed under
SUSE

lizards.opensuse.org: There are many approaches to managing software packages. Some users like to use command line tools like zypper. Others prefer a GUI tool like the YaST2 package selector. How do you select any of those filter views?

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Programming: Fonts, Jupyter, and Open Source FPGAs

  • 11 Best Programming Fonts
    There are many posts and sites comparing fonts for programming and they are all amazing articles. So why I repeated the same subject here? Since I always found myself lost in dozens of fonts and could not finger out which one was best for me. So today I tried many fonts and picked up the following fonts for you. These fonts are pretty popular and easy to get. And most importantly, all these fonts are FREE!
  • New open-source web apps available for students and faculty
    Jupyter is an open source web environment for writing code and visualizing data. Over the past few years, it has become increasingly popular across a wide range of academic disciplines. [...] JupyterHub is a variation of the Jupyter project, which adds support for user account management and enterprise authentication. The TLT instance allows students and faculty to log in with their credentials for full access to their own Jupyter environment and provides direct access to their Penn State Access Account Storage Space (PASS). Using PASS for storage provided a large persistent storage space that students and faculty were already familiar with and was easily accessible from the local lab systems or their personal devices.
  • An Ultrasound Driver With Open Source FPGAs
    Ultrasound imaging has been around for decades, but Open Source ultrasound has not. While there are a ton of projects out there attempting to create open ultrasound devices, most of this is concentrated on the image-processing side of things, and not the exceptionally difficult problem of pinging a sensor at millions of times a second, listening for the echo, and running that through a very high speed ADC. For his entry into the Hackaday Prize, [kelu124] is doing just that. He’s building an ultrasound board that’s built around Open Hardware, a fancy Open Source FPGA, and a lot of very difficult signal processing. It also uses some Rick and Morty references, so you know this is going to be popular with the Internet peanut gallery. The design of the ultrasound system is based around an iCE40 FPGA, the only FPGA with an Open Source toolchain. Along with this, there are a ton of ADCs, a DAC, pulsers, and a high voltage section to drive the off-the-shelf ultrasound head. If you’re wondering how this ultrasound board interfaces with the outside world, there’s a header for a Raspberry Pi on there, too, so this project has the requisite amount of blog cred.

today's howtos

FUD and Openwashing

OSS Leftovers

  • Eudora saved thanks to open sourcing
    It took the organisation some five years of wrangling with the Eudora's IP owner Qualcomm, but eventually the once much-loved Mac then more software got given the open source greenlight. Eudora was created in 1988 by Steve Dorner while he was working at the University of Illinois. As email started to get big in the world of computing so too did Eudora in the mid-1990s. Qualcomm licensed the software from the University of Illinois and hired Dorner.
  • Top 10 Weirdest Names for Open Source Projects
    In the early stages of developing a new open source project, most developers rarely take the time to think about their future branding strategy. After all, a great idea, top notch code, and a passionate following are the winning formula when you’re getting a project underway. However the name you choose for your project can play a role in picking up a loyal following and attracting the curious. Names have power. They indicate tone and the intent. They can, if chosen well, inspire and unify action. They’re an important part of a project’s brand and tone of voice.
  • SD Times Open-Source Project of the Week: Katran
    While engineers are likely to implement hardware-based solutions for handling network load balance, Facebook’s scale of operation far outweighed the practicality of hardware load balancing, instead requiring the development of a lightweight software solution. The current result of Facebook’s efforts is its latest open-source release, scalable network load balancer Katran.
  • How Far Is Far Enough?

    Now, a new project from the Memento team holds out the promise of similar optimizations for more generic Web sites. The concept for Memento Tracer is to crowd-source a database of webrecorder.io-like crawls of complex Web sites in a form that can be analyzed to generate abstract templates similar to the platform templates on which LOCKSS plugins are mostly based. [...]