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Tuesday, 27 Sep 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Novell has loss, missing Wall Street target

Filed under
SUSE

Novell Inc. reported a quarterly loss on Thursday, missing Wall Street forecasts as the business software maker's sales fell and it took a charge for a consulting unit that it aims to sell.

Why console apps still rock

Filed under
Software

I know there’s a portion of Ubuntu (and other distro) users who resent six virtual consoles running at a time, in addition to the X desktop in a default Ubuntu setup. I would agree that six is probably overkill, but removing them completely would be nuts.

Playing Classic Games

Filed under
Gaming

Many of us do still remember the Alley Cat and Mario and Contra and other classic games we used to play whether on Nintendo NES or DOS or SNES, these games were simple compared to todays games but were very entertaining nonetheless. In this article i describe how to play these games on your Ubuntu box.

Any objections? For Open XML standard, yes (still)

Filed under
Microsoft

Microsoft Corp.’s Open XML file format cleared a small hurdle Wednesday, after documents released by the International Organisation for Standardization (ISO) showed fewer countries harboring strong objections than had been expected.

Fosdem Slides Highlight New openSUSE Features

Filed under
SUSE

Andreas Jaeger presented slides at Fosdem 2007 on highlights of the major new features of openSUSE 10.3. One idea is to provide a minimal install of a base system and complete the remaining over the network to reduce downloading and media waste. Other key areas are performance improvements and early KDE 4 adoption.

Allowing Limited Sudo Access With Visudo

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HowTos

If you’ve used your Ubuntu machine for more than a week you’ve probably run into the sudo command. Now what happens when you have another user on that machine that needs certain superuser privileges but you don’t want to give them FULL access?

Fedora cleans its repositories, considers move to Free Software

Filed under
Linux

The Red Hat-sponsored Fedora project is undergoing several changes before the release of its next version. In preparation for Fedora 7, which will fuse the Core and Extra software repositories, Fedora's developers are auditing the repositories for non-free and non-open software that doesn't meet the project's guidelines. Eventually, the project may change its package guidelines to only allow Free Software.

Choice or Chaos? The High Cost of Linux Fragmentation

Filed under
Linux

Freedom of choice is one of the great benefits of Open Source Software in general and Linux in particular. However, a couple of announcements this week seem to indicate that market value of freedom of choice has dipped considerably. The biggest hurdle Linux adoption faced this week wasn't Microsoft, it was an enemy from within: Linux fragmentation.

Don’t Use Yum To Update To Fedora 7!

Filed under
Linux

The update from one Fedora version to the next by yum was never officially supported - however, given that you were brave enough it could work out. However, for the next Fedora version you shouldn’t try it because you might even make your system unbootable!

PCLinuxOS Magazine March 2007 Issue 7 Released!

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PCLOS

It is my privilege to announce on behalf of the team members of the PCLinuxOS Magazine Project sponsored by MyPCLinuxOS.com, the March 2007 issue (#7)  is available for download!  Our previous issues can also be downloaded.

Mozilla Firefox Wins Anti-Spam Award

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Moz/FF

Mozilla Firefox, a free, open-source web browser for Windows, Linux and Mac OS X, has long had a loyal cult following. Now Datamation’s readers have taken notice, choosing Firefox – narrowly – to win its Product of the Year award in the Anti-Spam category.

Eric Raymond: Yes, "open source" is still meaningful

Filed under
OSS

Writing in O'Reilly's Radar, Nat Torkington argues that the term "open source" is becoming meaningless. He points to SugarCRM's badgeware, through which, he claims, only two-thirds of their code is downloadable, and rPath and MontaVista, which "sell software that works on Linux but the software itself isn't actually open source."

Using squidGuard for content filtering

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HowTos

Content filtering for the Web can be a messy proposition. A business may need to block only the most objectionable Web sites, while schools may be required by law to follow a more thorough process. Whatever your needs, you can build a solution with only open source pieces: squid, squidGuard, and blacklists.

Dell censors IdeaStorm Linux dissent

Filed under
Linux

It seems pointless seeking ideas and feedback if you’re going to ignore and delete the ones you don’t like. That’s exactly what Dell is doing with its IdeaStorm web site, which has been set up by the company to solicit ideas and feedback.

Tamil Nadu gets dual-boot Win-Linux desktops

Filed under
Linux

The Indian state of Tamil Nadu has finalized a tender for 40,000 Lenovo desktops which can be installed with both Novell's Suse Linux and Microsoft's Windows XP Starter Edition.

Safeguarding the Keys to the Linux Kingdom

Filed under
Linux

Without proper controls, anyone with access to the root account -- the virtual "keys to the kingdom" -- is given complete super-user privileges without justification based on their job classification, specific duties or role within the IT department. This violates the security best-practices doctrine of least privilege, and can expose proprietary systems and information to malicious activity and sabotage.

extract audio from video or online stream

Filed under
HowTos

You can easily extract audio from video files such as avi, mpg, even flv! into mp3 uses either mplayer or ffmpeg. You can even record online stream into mp3, such as stream from radio cast.

Automate GUI testing with TestNG-Abbot

Filed under
News

TestNG-Abbot is a testing framework that breathes new life into testing GUI components. Understand the scenario and you'll find it surprisingly easy to isolate GUI components and then verify them using the framework's handy fixture objects.

Graphs in LaTeX using GNU Octave

Filed under
HowTos

I finished two assignments in my crappy ME 410 statics class that involved me making graphs and writing out equations on a computer. For the first one I used OpenOffice and it was really ghetto; I was determined to do a “proper one” for the second assignment, and so I went out to learn LaTeX and how to generate graphs using GNU Octave.

Automatic patch management with PatchQuest in a home environment

Filed under
Software

Patch management has become an area of concern for business networks and home networks as well. Updates and patches are continually developed by vendors to improve their solutions. Most network administrators would know the chaos resulting from the release of a new critical patch. PatchQuest is patch management software that frees administrators from manually managing patches for their existing Windows/Linux installations. Linux-Tip tested the free edition , which can manage up to 5 computers.

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More in Tux Machines

Proxmox VE 4.3 released

Proxmox Server Solutions GmbH today announced the general availability of Proxmox Virtual Environment 4.3. The hyper-converged open source server virtualization solution enables users to create and manage LXC containers and KVM virtual machines on the same host, and makes it easy to set up highly available clusters as well as to manage network and storage via an integrated web-based management interface. The new version of Proxmox VE 4.3 comes with a completely new comprehensive reference documentation. The new docu framework allows a global as well as contextual help function. Proxmox users can access and download the technical documentation via the central help-button (available in various formats like html, pdf and epub). A main asset of the new documentation is that it is always version specific to the current user’s software version. Opposed to the global help, the contextual help-button shows the user the documentation part he currently needs. Read more

Games for GNU/Linux

Security News

  • Tuesday's security updates
  • New Open Source Linux Ransomware Divides Infosec Community
    Following our investigation into this matter, and seeing the vitriol-filled reaction from some people in the infosec community, Zaitsev has told Softpedia that he decided to remove the project from GitHub, shortly after this article's publication. The original, unedited article is below.
  • Fax machines' custom Linux allows dial-up hack
    Party like it's 1999, phreakers: a bug in Epson multifunction printer firmware creates a vector to networks that don't have their own Internet connection. The exploit requirements are that an attacker can trick the victim into installing malicious firmware, and that the victim is using the device's fax line. The firmware is custom Linux, giving the printers a familiar networking environment for bad actors looking to exploit the fax line as an attack vector. Once they're in that ancient environment, it's possible to then move onto the network to which the the printer's connected. Yves-Noel Weweler, Ralf Spenneberg and Hendrik Schwartke of Open Source Training in Germany discovered the bug, which occurs because Epson WorkForce multifunction printers don't demand signed firmware images.
  • Google just saved the journalist who was hit by a 'record' cyberattack
    Google just stepped in with its massive server infrastructure to run interference for journalist Brian Krebs. Last week, Krebs' site, Krebs On Security, was hit by a massive distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attack that took it offline, the likes of which was a "record" that was nearly double the traffic his host Akamai had previously seen in cyberattacks. Now just days later, Krebs is back online behind the protection of Google, which offers a little-known program called Project Shield to help protect independent journalists and activists' websites from censorship. And in the case of Krebs, the DDoS attack was certainly that: The attempt to take his site down was in response to his recent reporting on a website called vDOS, a service allegedly created by two Israeli men that would carry out cyberattacks on behalf of paying customers.
  • Krebs DDoS aftermath: industry in shock at size, depth and complexity of attack
    “This attack didn’t stop, it came in wave after wave, hundreds of millions of packets per second,” says Josh Shaul, Akamai’s vice president of product management, when Techworld spoke to him. “This was different from anything we’ve ever seen before in our history of DDoS attacks. They hit our systems pretty hard.” Clearly still a bit stunned, Shaul describes the Krebs DDoS as unprecedented. Unlike previous large DDoS attacks such as the infamous one carried out on cyber-campaign group Spamhaus in 2013, this one did not use fancy amplification or reflection to muster its traffic. It was straight packet assault from the old school.
  • iOS 10 makes it easier to crack iPhone back-ups, says security firm
    INSECURITY FIRM Elcomsoft has measured the security of iOS 10 and found that the software is easier to hack than ever before. Elcomsoft is not doing Apple any favours here. The fruity firm has just launched the iPhone 7, which has as many problems as it has good things. Of course, there are no circumstances when vulnerable software is a good thing, but when you have just launched that version of the software, it is really bad timing. Don't hate the player, though, as this is what Elcomsoft, and what Apple, are supposed to be doing right. "We discovered a major security flaw in the iOS 10 back-up protection mechanism. This security flaw allowed us to develop a new attack that is able to bypass certain security checks when enumerating passwords protecting local (iTunes) back-ups made by iOS 10 devices," said Elcomsoft's Oleg Afonin in a blog post.
  • After Tesla: why cybersecurity is central to the car industry's future
    The news that a Tesla car was hacked from 12 miles away tells us that the explosive growth in automotive connectivity may be rapidly outpacing automotive security. This story is illustrative of two persistent problems afflicting many connected industries: the continuing proliferation of vulnerabilities in new software, and the misguided view that cybersecurity is separate from concept, design, engineering and production. This leads to a ‘fire brigade approach’ to cybersecurity where security is not baked in at the design stage for either hardware or software but added in after vulnerabilities are discovered by cybersecurity specialists once the product is already on the market.

Ofcom blesses Linux-powered, open source DIY radio ‘revolution’

Small scale DAB radio was (quite literally) conceived in an Ofcom engineer’s garden shed in Brighton, on a Raspberry Pi, running a full open source stack, in his spare time. Four years later, Ofcom has given the thumbs up to small scale DAB after concluding that trials in 10 UK cities were judged to be a hit. We gave you an exclusive glimpse into the trials last year, where you could compare the specialised proprietary encoders with the Raspberry Pi-powered encoders. “We believe that there is a significant level of demand from smaller radio stations for small scale DAB, and that a wider roll-out of additional small scale services into more geographic areas would be both technically possible and commercially sustainable,” notes Ofcom. Read more