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Sunday, 19 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Mandriva 2008 Brings Windows Migration Support

Filed under
MDV

softpedia: Cassini is the name of the first beta release of the upcoming Mandriva Linux 2008, announced yesterday by the Mandriva team. This beta is available only as a three CD Free edition (containing no non-free software or drivers) for the x86-32 architecture, with a traditional installer.

Linux Vs. Mac: Linux Users Respond

Filed under
OS

Serdar Yegulalp (informationweek): Linux users had some interesting opinions about our recent article comparing Mac OS X with Linux, and didn't leave Windows out of the discussion.

A move to Ubuntu after 10 years of Redhat/Fedora

Filed under
Ubuntu

chrismatchett blog: I have been using Redhat/Fedora linux for the past 10 years, starting with RedHat 5.0. I recently decided to move to Ubuntu and here are some reasons why…

How to sneak Linux into your office

Filed under
Linux

itbusiness: I’m actually beginning to picture a day when users start to ask their IT departments why they can’t run Ubuntu Linux at work, the way they do at home. Make a business case and make it stick. It's easier than you think.

The openSUSE Project Turns Two

Filed under
SUSE

openSUSE news: It happened again. Another year passed (flew by). Happy Birthday openSUSE! In the past 365 days we successfully released openSUSE 10.2 with numerous improvements and new features. Up until now it has been installed hundreds of thousands of times.

How To Convert Songs From An Audio CD Into MP3/Ogg Files With K3b

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

This guide describes how you can use the CD/DVD burning application K3b to convert songs from an audio CD into MP3 or Ogg files that you can use on your MP3 player.

Install extra Themes and Icons in PCLinuxOS

Filed under
PCLOS
HowTos

YALB: Are you a PCLinuxOS 2007 user? Are you one of the many that love the default theme and think it’s eye catching but wish you could change it and make it your own? Do you wish there were more themes, icon sets, and bling for your desktop that would be easy to add? Here’s how I was able to customize PCLinuxOS 2007.

Tip: Download Accelerator for Linux

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HowTos

All about Linux: There are different ways of downloading files from remote locations. The most common and fail safe method of downloading huge files in Linux is to use the wget tool. But here is a nice tip to speed up your download of files by a significant factor.

Torvalds, Red Hat are no shows at Linuxworld

Filed under
Linux

zdnet blogs: The two biggest names in the Linux industry – Linus Torvalds and Red Hat – skipped out on LinuxWorld again.

MySQL ends distribution of Enterprise source tarballs

Filed under
Software

linux.com: MySQL quietly let slip that it would no longer be distributing the MySQL Enterprise Server source as a tarball, not quite a year after the company announced a split between its paid and free versions.

Linux: Enforcing the Merge Window

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: Following a recent merge request, Linus Torvalds stressed that he was serious about not wanting to merge any big changes after the merge window closes, "get the changes in before -rc1, or just *wait*.

Ubuntu’nification

Filed under
Ubuntu

nixternal: My stance, I don’t think it is necessary to unify the names under the Ubuntu Desktop. It seems a large motive that I have seen so far is to answer the question of “What is Kubuntu?” or “What is Xubuntu?”.

Submit your nominations for the 2007 free software awards

Filed under
Software

fsf.org: The Free Software Foundation (FSF) and the GNU Project announce the requests for nominations for the 10th annual 2007 Free Software Awards.

Using GParted to Resize Your Windows Vista Partition

Filed under
HowTos

How-to Geek: One of the more advanced options for resizing your Windows Vista partition is to use the GParted Live CD, a bootable linux CD that takes you straight into GParted, the great linux utility for managing partitions. The problem is that if you resize your boot/system partition, you will be completely unable to boot without repairing windows.

Some short takes and stuff:

Filed under
News
  • How To use Yum

  • OLPC Mexico: Carlos Slim Buys 250,000 XO Laptops!
  • LinuxWorld: Partnership Love Is In The Air
  • Ways Of Updating To SLED Or SLES SP1
  • New Firefox support site targets your mom
  • Oracle on Linux Is No Game
  • AMD servers get SuSE Linux certified]
  • Lenovo and Dell tout Linux PCs
  • Install the LAMP stack with 3 commands!
  • Ubuntu Gutsy Tribe 4 to include Tracker-by-default
  • Me and FLOSS in the late '90s

Novell CEO confirms that Microsoft is a reality

Filed under
SUSE

the register: Novell's chief executive has justified his company's contentious Microsoft hook-up to open source devotees by claiming the deal is critical to the long-term success of their favorite operating system.

Linux on laptops? Oh, my! (video)

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: Some of the heaviest PR lead-up to this year's West Coast LinuxWorld Conference and Expo was about Linux on laptops, and specifically Novell's SUSE Linux on Lenovo laptops.

Mozilla pushes security in Firefox 3.0

Filed under
Moz/FF

(Computerworld) -- Mozilla Corp.'s next update to Firefox will sport several new safer surfing features, the company's chief of security said today, but users won't see the most important changes.

Linux as a Tool for Windows Hardware Errors

Filed under
Linux

In this article, Rais offers insights why Windows hardware failures may be causing some to update or replace devices that are still operational. Instead, he shows how powerful a tool Linux can be in tracking down hardware problems and validating some inherent issues with Windows device support...

Red Hat exec leery of Novell Linux effort

Filed under
Linux

InfoWorld: A call by Novell's CEO for a standardized way to certify Linux applications Wednesday was subsequently greeted with skepticism by a high-ranking official at rival Linux distributor Red Hat.

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Linux Mint 18.1 Is The Best Mint Yet

The hardcore Linux geeks won’t read this article. They’ll skip right past it… They don’t like Linux Mint much. There’s a good reason for them not to; it’s not designed for them. Linux Mint is for folks who want a stable, elegant desktop operating system that they don’t want to have to constantly tinker with. Anyone who is into Linux will find Mint rather boring because it can get as close to the bleeding edge of computer technology. That said, most of those same hardcore geeks will privately tell you that they’ve put Linux Mint on their Mom’s computer and she just loves it. Linux Mint is great for Mom. It’s stable, offers everything she needs and its familiar UI is easy for Windows refugees to figure out. If you think of Arch Linux as a finicky, high-performance sports car then Linux Mint is a reliable station wagon. The kind of car your Mom would drive. Well, I have always liked station wagons myself and if you’ve read this far then I guess you do, too. A ride in a nice station wagon, loaded with creature comforts, cold blowing AC, and a good sound system can be very relaxing, indeed. Read more

Make Gnome 3 more accessible for everyday use

Gnome 3 is a desktop environment that was created to fix a problem that did not exist. Much like PulseAudio, Wayland and Systemd, it's there to give developers a job, while offering no clear benefit over the original problem. The Gnome 2 desktop was fast, lithe, simple, and elegant, and its replacement is none of that. Maybe the presentation layer is a little less busy and you can search a bit more quickly, but that's about as far as the list of advantages goes, which is a pretty grim result for five years of coding. Despite my reservation toward Gnome 3, I still find it to be a little bit more suitable for general consumption than in the past. Some of the silly early decisions have been largely reverted, and a wee bit more sane functionality added. Not enough. Which is why I'd like to take a moment or three to discuss some extra tweaks and changes you should add to this desktop environment to make it palatable. Read more

When to Use Which Debian Linux Repository

Nothing distinguishes the Debian Linux distribution so much as its system of package repositories. Originally organized into Stable, Testing, and Unstable, additional repositories have been added over the years, until today it takes more than a knowledge of a repository's name to understand how to use it efficiently and safely. Debian repositories are installed with a section called main that consists only of free software. However, by editing the file /etc/apt/sources.list, you can add contrib, which contains software that depends on proprietary software, and non-free, which contains proprietary software. Unless you choose to use only free software, contrib and non-free are especially useful for video and wireless drivers. You should also know that the three main repositories are named for characters from the Toy Story movies. Unstable is always called Sid, while the names of Testing and Stable change. When a new version of Debian is released, Testing becomes Stable, and the new version of Testing receives a name. These names are sometimes necessary for enabling a mirror site, but otherwise, ignoring these names gives you one less thing to remember. Read more

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