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About Tux Machines

Monday, 16 Jul 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Are large screen Android phones destroying the iPhone? Rianne Schestowitz 14/01/2014 - 2:56am
Story Linux-friendly mini-PC moves to Haswell CPUs Rianne Schestowitz 14/01/2014 - 1:46am
Story Those Krazy Kids & KDE Rianne Schestowitz 14/01/2014 - 1:35am
Story Ubuntu 13.04 Received Its Last Major Kernel Update Rianne Schestowitz 14/01/2014 - 1:27am
Story Ubuntu 12.04 Is More Secure Than Windows 8 and Mac OS X, Says UK Government Roy Schestowitz 13/01/2014 - 7:57pm
Story Jolla Review: Some Rough Edges, But This Linux Smartphone Shows Promise Roy Schestowitz 13/01/2014 - 7:47pm
Story Best Email clients for Linux Roy Schestowitz 13/01/2014 - 7:38pm
Story Client Side Decoration Improvements Land In GTK+ Rianne Schestowitz 13/01/2014 - 7:32pm
Story Who's afraid of Linux, anyway? Roy Schestowitz 13/01/2014 - 7:30pm
Story Coreboot Improvements Land For Lenovo Laptops Rianne Schestowitz 13/01/2014 - 7:27pm

System encryption on Debian Etch

Filed under
HowTos

In this article I will describe how to setup a nearly complete encrypted system using Debian Etch and cryptsetup with LUKS. The goal is: encrypt all partitions except /boot.

The Linux Equation

Filed under
Linux

For a long time, it's been a given that anything on our Web site that includes the word "Linux" will generate an extra-special amount of reader traffic. But I never dreamed this week's LinuxWorld conference track on "Linux in the Channel" would be sold out—more than five times the anticipated attendees registered.

Book Review: Web Design in a Nutshell - A Desktop Quick Reference

Filed under
Reviews

I found the book "Web Design In A Nutshell - A Quick Desktop Reference" authored by Jennifer Niederst Robbins and published by O'Reilly to be a one of a kind book in that it covers all the important concepts right from HTML 4.1 to XHTML, CSS, Java Script and much more.

A Quick Look at that Windows site's Linux Distro

Filed under
Linux
Reviews
-s

When I read of this Windows site working on their own Linux distribution, not only did I wonder why, but I also wondered what it might be like. It was stated that it was based on Morphix, so that was a clue, but I still wanted to take a quick look. I share my quick look with you.

Woohoo! Slackware Linux 11.0 RC1 Released!

Filed under
Slack

The long development process of Slackware Linux 11.0 is about to conclude - that's according to Patrick Volkerding who has declared the "current" tree as RC1: "There are still a few changes yet to happen, but let's call this Slackware 11.0 release candidate 1." Other recent changes include upgrade to stable kernel 2.4.33; upgrade to udev 097, and rebuild of glibc 2.3.6 for both 2.4.33 and 2.6.16.27 kernels. The new release will ship with X.Org 6.9.0 and KDE 3.5.4, and will provide SeaMonkey instead of Mozilla.

Novell and Red Hat spat over Xen

Filed under
Software

Novell's chief technology officer, Markus Rex, has hit back at criticism that the company included an unstable Xen virtualisation environment in its new Linux server, pointing to support from hardware partners.

Doubts dog anonymous Thinkpad code for Linux kernel

Filed under
Linux

DOUBTS have arisen over lines of code an anonymous submitter sent to the Linux kernel mailing list on August 6th. The programmer is hiding behind a pseudonym, Shem Multinymous. Fellow Kernel programmers are divided over accepting the code or not.

Open Source Eyes Telecom

Filed under
OSS

The open-source movement might not be making Cisco Systems Inc. nervous yet, but it's definitely intent on becoming a serious factor in the networking sphere.

n/a

CLI Magic: Enhance your YouTube viewing pleasure

Filed under
HowTos

Publishing your own video on YouTube, or watching other people's videos, is all the rage these days. Why are we talking about YouTube, in a column about the CLI? Because this week we're writing about youtube-dl, a clever little CLI tool that's easy to install and and use to fetch YouTube videos.

Thailand Plans 1 Free Laptop Per Child

Filed under
OLPC

Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra has announced that an ambitious project to provide low-cost laptop computers to all of Thailand's millions of elementary school students will begin in October.

The U.S.-based "One Laptop per Child" project aims to deliver up to 30 computers to Thailand in October and 500 more in November, Thaksin said in a nationwide radio broadcast on Saturday.

'Honest' open source licence aims to close GPL loophole

Filed under
OSS

An Open source entrepreneur has published a new 'Honest Public Licence' (HPL) that aims to close loopholes which let firms offering hosted applications escape key stipulations of the General Public License (GPL).

Windows Site Linux Distro Reaches 0.3

Filed under
Linux

Tech news and discussions website, Neowin.net, has started developing it’s own distribution of Linux, titled Shift, which has just reached version 0.3.

Linux Collaboration: All About The Apps

Filed under
Software

For years, pundits have proclaimed that the Linux Desktop is coming, and yet it was still lacking in some of the critical collaboration apps that enterprises rely on. Some have argued that without key collaboration applications that can interface with Microsoft's Exchange, enterprises won't adopt Linux. That's going to change this year.

Researchers: OpenOffice.org Security 'Insufficient'

Filed under
Security

With Microsoft's Office suite now being targeted by hackers, researchers at the French Ministry of Defence say users of the OpenOffice.org software may be at even greater risk from computer viruses.

IBM Unveils Linux IM, HP Unveils Debian

Filed under
Linux

IBM is taking instant messaging to Linux—on both the desktop and server. The company will use the LinuxWorld Conference & Expo to announce that it will support Linux. Hewlett-Packard, of Palo Alto, Calif., will use LinuxWorld to announce global support for the Debian Linux distribution.

Linux Phrasebook Reviewed

Filed under
Reviews

One of the greatest strengths of the Linux operating system is the power of the command line. Scott Granneman has compiled a collection of Linux commands that will allow you to do almost anything you need to do from a terminal.

Class Assignment: Implement a Open Source Solution for Non-Profits

Filed under
OSS

The undergraduate students in the George Fox University management and business information systems program will be asked to solve an organization's information system problems. Students will rely on open-source software.

Java on Linux vs MS-Win XP

Filed under
Just talk

The computer lab we were using at Western Oregon University had Windows XP on all the machines. The first day of class, I used Win-XP for a few minutes--but I just couldn't stand it anymore . . . I whipped-out my PCLinuxOS CD I'd brought along with me, and proceeded to install Linux on the machine . . .

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More in Tux Machines

GNOME: GUADEC, GSoC, GitLab

  • Petr Kovar: GUADEC 2018
    Back from GUADEC, held in the beautiful Andalusian city of Almería, Spain, from 6th July through 11th July, 2018, I wanted to share a few notes wrt documentation and localization activities at the conference and during the traditional post-conference hacking days.
  • GUADEC18 Developer Center BoF Part 1: The Developer Experience
    At this year’s GUADEC lightning talks I spontaneously announced and arranged a Developer Center BoF (Birds of a Feather) session. We were six attendants who met together Wednesday the 11th September. I think it is important that we communicate our doings to the rest of the community, so I will make a few short blog posts based on our meeting notes and my own thoughts on the subject.
  • GSoC 2018: Safe Shared Access to Cairo Image Surfaces
    I’m working on librsvg, a GNOME SVG rendering library, to port the SVG filter effects and related infrastructure from C to Rust. Librsvg uses Cairo, a 2D graphics library, for most of its drawing operations. Cairo can draw to a number of different surfaces like XCB and Xlib windows and pixmaps, PDF documents and PostScript files.
  • Have you ever commented while angry?
    Here’s my proposal (feature request for GitLab / irssi?

OSS: Apache Cassandra, Jib,WSO2 and More

  • Apache Cassandra at 10: Making a community believe in NoSQL
    Ten years ago this month, when Lehman Brothers was still just about in business and the term NoSQL wasn't even widely known, let alone an irritant, Facebook engineers open-sourced a distributed database system named Cassandra. Back then, the idea that huge numbers of companies would need a scalable database was almost laughable – and that grip of traditional relational database systems is reflected in the mythical moniker given to what would become one of the first of many databases designed to run on a cluster of machines. Named after the Greek figure who was cursed to utter the truth but was never believed, Cassandra might seem an odd choice for a system whose raison d'être is believability – but it delivered a nice dig at the stalwarts of the RDBMS world… and their trust in a false Oracle.
  • Google Launches Jib, Automated Container Packaging for Java Apps
    Google has released software that could automate the packaging of a Java program so that it can be run in the cloud-native environment. Jib is an open-source Java “containerizer,” one that handles all the steps of packaging your application into a container image, according to Appu Goundan and Qingyang Chen, two Google engineers who co-wrote a blog post announcing the new technology. Created over two decades ago at Sun Microsystems, Java was introduced as a “write once, run anywhere” programming language, where all the code would be packaged in a JAR file, and run by a Java Virtual Machine on any platform. The requirements for running code anywhere have expanded with the introduction of containerization, however. Few shops are Java-only these days, and many are turning to containerization for true application portability,
  • WSO2 Summer 2018 Release Brings Agility to Secure Microservices Integration
  • New Operations in Mexico Extend WSO2’s Reach Across Latin America
  • How Open Source Became The Default Business Model For Software
  • 10 Best Kodi Addons You Should Install In 2018 | Legal Addons
    Kodi is one of the most popular media player software which enables you to access videos, music, and pictures via the internet or local storage on a host of platforms. Managed by XBMC foundation, Kodi is an open source software. However, its reputation has been soiled by labeling it as a piracy bearer, and that is why many ask “Is Kodi legal?” You can read more about Kodi and whether it is legal or not here.
  • Summer of Code: Plan for the grand finale
    To get that done, I have to polish up my smack-openpgp branch which has grown to a size of 7000 loc. There are still some minor quirks, but Florian recommended to focus on the big picture instead of spending too much time on small details and edge cases. I also have to release pgpainless to maven central and establish some kind of release cycle. It will be a future challenge for me personally to synchronize the releases of smack-openpgp and pgpainless.
  • Collaborative World Shaping: Why Open-Source Tech Matters in a For-Impact Future
    How many lives could be saved if there was a way to vastly cut down inefficiency and through bureaucracy, by problem solving at a global scale? Could technology help us reach more individuals in need more meaningfully, substantially helping people affected by disasters – in less time? The technology is already out there – but not enough people know about it. In 2017, Hurricane Irma—the strongest hurricane ever recorded in the Atlantic Ocean—made landfall; with widespread, “catastrophic” damage, disaster relief organizations were overwhelmed. “A lot of traditional means of crisis response are very top down, and they didn’t really kick in — we saw headlines about how the Red Cross didn’t show up to shelters,” said Greg Bloom, a community organizer and civic hacker who knew he had to step in to assist.
  • The First Open-Source Smart Contract Platform to be Started by Rootstock
    RSK Labs, formerly known as Rootstock, an Argentinian startup building the first open-source smart contract platform with a 2-way peg to Bitcoin.RSK Labs CEO Diego Gutiérrez Zaldívar on Bitcoin Smart Contracts Sidechain and Crypto Industry Challenges. Even though at this point of time the 2-way peg security of the RSK blockchain is still relying on a group of third parties called ‘Federation’, in the future the developers promise to bring a “trustless” automatic peg. How fast this happens to some degree depends on the overall miners support. The company says its goal is to add value and functionality to the Bitcoin ecosystem by enabling Ethereum-like smart-contracts, near instant payments and higher-scalability, and this past January after almost two years of development its mainnet dubbed Bamboo was finally launched.
  • Creality’s Ender 3 3D Printer is Now Fully Open Source
    Creality3D, founded in 2014, is a 3D printer manufacturer based in China, offering more than 20 products. Their popular Ender 3 was recently voted “Best 3D Printer Under $200” by All3DP (review here). Now, the company is making their most popular 3D printer, the Ender 3, completely open source. This makes it the first Open Source Hardware Association certified 3D printer in China. This means not just a few files have been shared, but all hardware, CAD files, board schematics and firmware files are available. You can find the updated versions on the company’s GitHub page.
  • Charité's researchers integrate open-source platform into the 'Human Brain Project'
    Universitätsmedizin Berlin and the Berlin Institute of Health (BIH) are pleased to announce that 'The Virtual Brain' neuroinformatics platform has joined the EU's Flagship 'Human Brain Project'. With financial support from the EU's Horizon 2020 research and innovation program, Charité's researchers are now integrating their open-source platform into the 'Human Brain Project'. This will provide participating researchers with a research infrastructure that promotes efficiency and reproducibility. The researchers will focus on refining the theoretical underpinnings of the computer models used, developing efficient simulation technology, and working on neuroinformatics solutions that enhance the reproducibility of studies.

Kernel and Graphics: PDS, VKMS and Nouveau

  • PDS 0.98s release
    PDS 0.98s is released with the following changes 1. Fix compilation issue on raspberry pi. 2. Minor rework and optimization on balance code path. 3. Fix wrong nr_max_tries in migrate_pending_tasks. This is mainly a bug fix and minor optimization release for 4.17. The rework of balance code doesn't go well, it actually make more overhead than current implement. Another rework which based on current implement is still on going, hopefully be included in next release.
  • PDS-MQ CPU Scheduler Revised For The Linux 4.17 Kernel With Minor Optimizations
    Alfred Chen announced this week the release of PDS-mq 0.98s, his latest patch-set of this CPU scheduler against the Linux 4.17 upstream code-base and includes minor optimization work and bug fixes. The PDS scheduler stands for the "Priority and Deadline based Skiplist multiple queue scheduler" that is derived from Con Kolivas' former BFS scheduler with Variable Run Queue (VRQ) support. PDS design principles are to be a simple CPU process scheduler yet efficient and scalable. PDS-mq differs from Con Kolivas' current MuQSS scheduler.
  • Add infrastructure for Vblank and page flip events in vkms simulated by hrtimer
    Since the beginning of May 2018, I have been diving into the DRM subsystem. In the beginning, nothing made sense to me, and I had to fight hard to understand how things work. Fortunately, I was not alone, and I had great support from Gustavo Padovan, Daniel Vetter, Haneen Mohammed, and the entire community. Recently, I finally delivered a new feature for VKMS: the infrastructure for Vblank and page flip events. At this moment, VKMS have regular Vblank events simulated through hrtimers (see drm-misc-next), which is a feature required by VKMS to mimic real hardware [6]. The development approach was entirely driven by the tests provided by IGT, more specifically the kms_flip. I modified IGT to read a module name via command line and force the use of it, instead of using only the modules defined in the code (patch submitted to IGT, see [1]). With this modification in the IGT, my development process to add a Vblank infrastructure to VKMS had three main steps as Figure 1 describes.
  • The State Of The VKMS Driver, Preparations For vBlank & Page Flip Events
    One of the exciting additions to look forward to with the upcoming Linux 4.19 kernel cycle is the virtual "VKMS" kernel mode-setting driver. The driver is still a work-in-progress, but multiple developers are working on it.
  • NIR Continues To Be Prepped For OpenCL Support
    Longtime Nouveau contributor Karol Herbst who joined Red Hat several months ago has been working on Nouveau NIR support as stepping towards SPIR-V/compute support and this summer the work very much remains an active target.
  • Nouveau Gallium3D Moves Closer Towards OpenGL 4.5 Compliance
    While the RadeonSI and Intel i965 Mesa drivers have been at OpenGL 4.5 compliance for a while now, the Nouveau "NVC0" Gallium3D driver has been bound to OpenGL 4.3 officially. This Nouveau Gallium3D driver for NVIDIA "Fermi" graphics hardware and newer has effectively supported all of the OpenGL 4.4/4.5 extensions, but not officially. Originally the NVC0 problem for OpenGL 4.4 and newer was the requirement of passing the OpenGL Conformance Test Suite (CTS), which at first wasn't open-source. But now The Khronos Group has made it available to everyone as open-source. Additionally, the proper legal wrangling is in place so the Nouveau driver could become a conforming Khronos adopter under the X.Org Foundation without any associated costs/fees with Nouveau being purely open-source and primarily considered a community driver.

DistroWatch The Best Website For Distro Hoppers

The DistroWatch features release announcements of new versions of hundreds of Linux and other distributions. It does host reviews of distros, podcasts, and newsletters. DistroWatch first published by Ladislav Bodnar, the founder, and maintainer, on May 31, 2001. DistroWatch initially focused on Linux distributions. But later based on user requests, it went on adding different flavors of operating systems like BSD family, Android x86, Oracle Solaris, MINIX, and Haiku etc. The DistroWatch presents detailed information at one place in a very convenient manner. At the time of writing this article, the DistroWatch hosted information of more than 300 active distributions (referring the list of distros populated under drop-down feature on the first page of the DistroWatch) and more than hundred in queue. It is said that the DistroWatch lives out of advertising and donation. LinuxCD.org is the first to advertise on the DistroWatch site. Read more